Fully Vaccinated / Partially Vaccinated

RhoKappa

Senior Member
Standard American English
Now that we have COVID-19 as part of our lives, I want to make myself very clear to others if I am vaccinated. The online dictionary here defines vaccinated as синонимы. However, how does one say that he is fully vaccinated versus partially vaccinated? Fully vaccinated = two doses. Partially Vaccinated = only one dose. Examples.

1. Yuri took his second shot, so he is fully vaccinated.
2. Tanya took only her first shot, so she is partially vaccinated.
3. Neznaika will most likely never be vaccinated.

Как сказать по-русски?
 
  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Nothing complicated here, по́лностью/части́чно вакцини́рованный. The only tricky part is idiomacy of various expressions.
    1. Ю́рию сде́лали втору́ю приви́вку, та́к что тепе́рь о́н по́лностью вакцини́рован.
    2. Та́не пока́ сде́лали то́лько оди́н уко́л (= одну́ приви́вку) - она́ части́чно вакцини́рована.
    3. Незна́йка, скоре́е всего́, та́к никогда́ и не привьётся (= вакцини́руется).
    Note that Sputnik V is a vector vaccine consisting of two different components, so it's often specifically mentioned "вакцини́рован по кра́йней ме́ре одни́м компоне́нтом".
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Частично вакцинирован = partially vaccinated.
    Полностью вакцинирован = fully vaccinated.

    I might also say: мне сделали только одну прививку / один укол (assuming people know that full vaccination implies two jabs).
     

    MIDAV

    Senior Member
    Russian
    My preference would be:
    partially vaccinated = частично привитый
    fully vaccinated = полностью привитый


    In fact, I'm struggling with the fact that we are currently using two different words to describe the exact same thing. Вакцинировать and its derivatives seem to be preferred by the media for no obvious reason. My best guess is it's due to the dominant position of the English language.
     

    nizzebro

    Senior Member
    Russian
    partially vaccinated = частично привитый
    fully vaccinated = полностью привитый
    To me, these adjectives are good only for cattle (even though people deserve such wording probably).
    'Я сделал прививку' will do.
    I fully agree with you regarding 'вакцинировать'. Maybe it was in use as a medical term before, but never in an ordinary context.
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    I disagree. To me, either's fine when used to describe people. "Вакцинировать" must be a calque of sorts on its English equivalent and the word indeed sounds more highbrow to me. But "прививка", "привиться" aren't wrong, don't have cattle related connotations and are widely used by people of every hue in Russia.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Off the top of my head, I can’t come up with a sentence where привитый wouldn’t work but вакцинированный would.
    Limitations are merely stylistical. Вакцинированный is more formal, while привитый/привитой is more peculiar to the everyday speech. Привитой is somewhat outdated.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In addition to translating from English, there may be other reasons for "вакцинировать" (and its derivatives) to be preferred these days.

    First, "вакцинировать" has always been used by professionals to talk about vaccinating populations of people/animals (and we're in the middle of a pandemic).

    Second, "привить" historically refers to traditional vaccines (attenuated or inactivated)*, but those are being massively replaced with what some people can't even refer to as "vaccines".

    _____________________
    * In former times, people would say "привить оспу/чуму..." (sic!).
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    I'm not sure history of vaccination has anything to do with the usage of these words. At least, according to the modern dictionary, привить - ввести кому-л. в организм вакцину для предупреждения или лечения заболевания.
    After all, vaccination also firstly referred to the smallpox particle taken from a cow (Latin - vacca).
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    After all, vaccination also firstly referred to the smallpox particle taken from a cow (Latin - vacca).
    Yes, and in the Russian language it was called "оспопрививание".
    The new types of vaccines don't прививают коронавирус - they are hi-tech products, the effectiveness of which still raises questions.
     

    MIDAV

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In addition to translating from English, there may be other reasons for "вакцинировать" (and its derivatives) to be preferred these days.

    First, "вакцинировать" has always been used by professionals to talk about vaccinating populations of people/animals (and we're in the middle of a pandemic).

    Second, "привить" historically refers to traditional vaccines (attenuated or inactivated)*, but those are being massively replaced with what some people can't even refer to as "vaccines".

    _____________________
    * In former times, people would say "привить оспу/чуму..." (sic!).

    Well, I'm pretty sure health-care professionals are using a lot of vaccine-related terms that would be totally alien to us laypeople. I can't really see why we should bother learning the details.

    My point is we would have been served just as well just using (continuing to use) the verb прививать avoiding вакцинировать which I assume is a relatively recent entrant into our everyday language. Again, as Şafak said above, it's hard to imagine a situation where you, as a layman, can only use one but not the other.
     

    TheGrowler

    New Member
    Russian
    My point is we would have been served just as well just using (continuing to use) the verb прививать avoiding вакцинировать which I assume is a relatively recent entrant into our everyday language.
    Not really recent

    Вакцина. Французскоеvaccine. Латинскоеvaccina (коровья). Слово «вакцина» было заимствовано из французского языка во второй половине XIX в., широкое распространение получило во второй половине столетия. Слово содержит латинскую основу «vacca» со значением «корова». Столь интересная этимология объясняется следующим фактом: вакцину против оспы изготавливали из коровьих оспинок. Производное: вакцинация.

    (Этимология слова вакцина)
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Again, as Şafak said above, it's hard to imagine a situation where you, as a layman, can only use one but not the other.
    In order to talk about the jab that someone has had, we certainly don't need the term "вакцинация" (or other words with the same root). With that, I fully agree.

    But general concepts related to vaccination are often better conveyed with "вакцинация" (or other words with the same root), e.g.:

    Этот ослабленный штамм с 1936 г. применяется для вакцинации людей. (Source: Google Books.)
    Современным и наиболее перспективным методом борьбы и профилактики бешенства диких животных можно назвать оральную вакцинацию. (Idem.)
    One doesn't have to be a professional to talk about such things, I guess.
     

    Ruukr

    Senior Member
    Odessa, Russian - Ukrainian
    Now that we have COVID-19 as part of our lives, I want to make myself very clear to others if I am vaccinated. The online dictionary here defines vaccinated as синонимы. However, how does one say that he is fully vaccinated versus partially vaccinated? Fully vaccinated = two doses. Partially Vaccinated = only one dose. Examples.

    1. Yuri took his second shot, so he is fully vaccinated.
    2. Tanya took only her first shot, so she is partially vaccinated.
    3. Neznaika will most likely never be vaccinated.

    Как сказать по-русски?
    Fully vaccinated - actually, to be three vaccinations. The others are less.
    Если скажете - Я полностью вакцинирован. (это будет не очень понятно, и не очень по русски).
    А если так:
    Я сделал уже полностью все прививки. - абсолютно точное попадание. ))))
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Fully vaccinated - actually, to be three vaccinations. The others are less.
    Если скажете - Я полностью вакцинирован. (это будет не очень понятно, и не очень по русски).
    А если так:
    Я сделал уже полностью все прививки. - абсолютно точное попадание. ))))
    If I understand you correctly… I must admit I have to strongly disagree with you.
    Полностью вакцинирован is a proper sentence. It’s actually a very common way of saying that you’re fully vaccinated.
    «Я уже сделал все прививки» is flawed in many ways. First of all, it doesn’t mean you’re fully vaccinated against, let’s say, Covid.
     

    Ruukr

    Senior Member
    Odessa, Russian - Ukrainian
    If I understand you correctly… I must admit I have to strongly disagree with you.
    Полностью вакцинирован is a proper sentence. It’s actually a very common way of saying that you’re fully vaccinated.
    «Я уже сделал все прививки» is flawed in many ways. First of all, it doesn’t mean you’re fully vaccinated against, let’s say, Covid.
    Я Вам так скажу, что "полностью вакцинирован" - так могут сказать по телевизору.
    а "я сделал все прививки", или "я уже всё сделал", или "мне поставили все уколы", или что угодно - это в разговорной речи.
     
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