fund

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Gavril

Senior Member
English, USA
The first definition of “fund” at dictionary.com is:

a supply of money or pecuniary resources, as for some purpose: a fund for his education; a retirement fund.
English fund, and the equivalent words in many other European languages, are based on Latin fundus “bottom, estate”.

Icelandic sjóður “fund” < Old Icelandic sjóðr ”bag”

Finnish rahasto “fund” < raha ”money” + the collective suffix -sto


What is your language’s word for “fund”, and what is its origin (if you know it)?
 
  • swift

    Senior Member
    Spanish – Costa Rica (Valle Central)
    In French we have 'fonds', from Latin fundus. The distinction between fond and fonds with an 's' was stressed by Vaugelas in 1647.
     
    Hi Gavril,

    I think the word fund in your examples (a fund for his education; a retirement fund) is translated as «καταπίστευμα» /kata'pistevma/ (neut.) in Greek, a modern (1840) construction.
    In general, fund is translated as «ταμείο» /ta'mio/ (neut.) a Classical neuter noun «ταμιεῖον/ταμεῖον» (tămĭ'eiŏn [uncontracted]/tă'meiŏn [contracted])--> treasury, storehouse, in Modern Greek also, cash desk/register, ticket office. PIE base *tem-, to cut (cf. Lat. templum; OCS tьnǫ; Old Gaelic tanmaid)
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    In Greek:

    χρηματικό κεφάλαιο or χρηματικό απόθεμα /xrimati'ko ce'faleo/ or /xrimati'ko a'poθema/ is what I have in mind. χρηματικό (adj. meaning "related to money" in Modern Greek) < χρῆμα (noun meaning in Anc. Greek"a thing that one needs" and "money" in Modern Greek) < χρή (ancient Greek verb meaning "it is necessary"). κεφάλαιο is the equivalent of the English "capital"; it is noun and derives from the adj. "κεφάλαιος-α-ον" which derives from the noun "κεφαλή" (= head). απόθεμα means "supply","fund","savings", and derives from the verb "αποθέτω" < "αποτίθημι" , ancient Greek verb meaning -among other things - "put away/stow away".

    Edit: cross-posted with apmoy70 (another perspective, maybe).
     
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    Favara

    Senior Member
    Catalan - Southern Val.
    Catalan has fons (Latin fundus, just like French & Spanish). Singular and plural are the same (el fons, els fons).
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    alap

    The original meaning of this word is base, fund, bottom ... (from a Finno-Ugric root, see alá, alatt - under, beneath etc.)
     
    Last edited:
    Hi Gavril,

    I think the word fund in your examples (a fund for his education; a retirement fund) is translated as «καταπίστευμα» /kata'pistevma/ (neut.) in Greek, a modern (1840) construction.
    In general, fund is translated as «ταμείο» /ta'mio/ (neut.) a Classical neuter noun «ταμιεῖον/ταμεῖον» (tămĭ'eiŏn [uncontracted]/tă'meiŏn [contracted])--> treasury, storehouse, in Modern Greek also, cash desk/register, ticket office. PIE base *tem-, to cut (cf. Lat. templum; OCS tьnǫ; Old Gaelic tanmaid)
    &
    In Greek:

    χρηματικό κεφάλαιο or χρηματικό απόθεμα /xrimati'ko ce'faleo/ or /xrimati'ko a'poθema/ is what I have in mind. χρηματικό (adj. meaning "related to money" in Modern Greek) < χρῆμα (noun meaning in Anc. Greek"a thing that one needs" and "money" in Modern Greek) < χρή (ancient Greek verb meaning "it is necessary"). κεφάλαιο is the equivalent of the English "capital"; it is noun and derives from the adj. "κεφάλαιος-α-ον" which derives from the noun "κεφαλή" (= head). απόθεμα means "supply","fund","savings", and derives from the verb "αποθέτω" < "αποτίθημι" , ancient Greek verb meaning -among other things - "put away/stow away".

    Edit: cross-posted with apmoy70 (another perspective, maybe).
    Actually Perseas, I think we're both correct.
    In the examples given by Gavril, the fund is available money set aside for a specific purpose. That in Greek is a «καταπίστευμα» /kata'pistevma/ (neut.).
    Also an organization established to administer and manage a sum of money is in Greek a «ταμείο» /ta'mio/ (neut.).
    But, the fund in the sense of a sum of money available for a purpose or ready cash, is a «χρηματικό κεφάλαιο» /xrimati'ko ce'faleo/ (both neut.).
    You have described «χρηματικό απόθεμα» perfectly :)
     

    Gavril

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Slovene sklad "fund" seems to be connected to sklad "layer, pile (of wood, etc.)", but I'm not sure.

    Armenian հիմնադրամ (himnatram / himnadram) "fund" < himn "base, foundation" + tram / dram " money"
     
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    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Japanese:
    資金shikin : shi meaning material, talent; kin meaning money, metal (lit. money for material)
    We also say 基金kikin, that literal meaning is a bit similar to Latin (ki meaning base, bottom)
     

    810senior

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    I don't want to open a side thread, but one small question, 810sr.: can shi not also mean something like energy, rice, etc. ? (Sushi = ... [fish ???] + rice )
    shikin and kikin are compound of two Kanji(Chinese characters) so I can easily make each word come off, but sushi doesn't fit in that case. Because sushi is not a compound word. (sushi is derived from susu[酢す] meaning soak something with vinegar)
     
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