fundamental work

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering whether the underlined part is idiomatic:

"He should do the fundamental work since she is at lower portion of the company."

Context and thoughts:I am looking for a term to generally refer to such kind of job which is apart form the administrative work and in a lower position in a company.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I find "fundamental work" confusing in this sentence, Sun. "Work" by itself should express the same idea: He should do the work since/because she holds a lower position in the company.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I find "fundamental work" confusing in this sentence, Sun. "Work" by itself should express the same idea: He should do the work since/because she holds a lower position in the company.
    Thanks. I was looking for a term. If someone asked her what he did in a company and she didn't want to give him the specific answer, I was wondering whether she can say:

    "I am doing some fundamental work."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    She could say that, Sun, but I'd ask her what she meant by "fundamental work" if she used that term in a conversation with me.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    She could say that, Sun, but I'd ask her what she meant by "fundamental work" if she used that term in a conversation with me.
    If she appears that she doesn't want to talk about it or it might be her secret. Will fundamental work make sense? She just want to mean she is doing something basic and trivial.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If you really want to use "fundamental work" as a euphemism for "unimportant work" or "work that gives the worker no special status", then use it. Try not to get too annoyed if your poor listener doesn't understand what "fundamental work" means to you.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    If you really want to use "fundamental work" as a euphemism for "unimportant work" or "work that gives the worker no special status", then use it. Try not to get too annoyed if your poor listener doesn't understand what "fundamental work" means to you.
    Got it. Thank you very much.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I was looking for a term. If someone asked her what he did in a company and she didn't want to give him the specific answer, I was wondering whether she can say:

    "I am doing some fundamental work."
    I'm the office dogsbody might be an option. :)

    dogsbody
    A person who is given menial tasks to do, especially a junior in an office: I got myself a job as typist and general dogsbody on a small magazine.
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    To me fundamental work does not sound like an unimportant work. On the contrary, if I heard she does a fundamental work at the company I'd rather think she's doing some sort of fundamental studies that are so important that she chooses not to reveal details, or she is defining company strategy for the Board of Directors...
     

    Kirill V.

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I heard the word grassroot in contexts that looked similar but maybe not exactly. I wonder whether it could work in this context, like: What is she doing there? - Well, she's doing some grassroot job, you know, simple job
    Or maybe grassroot is a "higher register"?
     
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