Funny, strange, weird

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Maayan

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hi everyone,

Which of the three sentences sound better?

1. (That's) funny, I don't remember what I did last night
2. (That's) strange, I don't remember what I did last night
3. (That's) weird, I don't remember what I did last night

And is it ok to ommit the first two words in each sentence? (That is)

Also, when I read these sentences I don't get the feeling of much difference between them. Native-speakers of English: Do these sentences imply different levels of urgency stand-alone or will you need the full context anyway in order to decide on the level of urgency?
 
  • pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    My interpretation:

    With the "that's", the sentences read as pretty much the same. However, if you leave it out, the first sentence, and possibly the second, take on a different tone.

    "Funny, I don't remember what I did last night" sounds like the speaker is challening the assertion of another person.

    Although this particular sentence is a little odd, truth be told. In a situation where you didn't remember anything you did the night before, 'funny' might not be approriate. Consider this variation, however.

    1. Funny, I don't remember doing that last night

    I'm pretty sure I didn't do that last night, I think you're making it up

    2. Strange, I don't remember doing that last night

    I don't think that happened, but I might have been drunker than I thought and you might be telling the truth

    3. Weird, I don't remember doing that last night


    I must have been really drunk. (Thanks for telling me).
     

    Maayan

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    My interpretation:

    With the "that's", the sentences read as pretty much the same. However, if you leave it out, the first sentence, and possibly the second, take on a different tone.

    "Funny, I don't remember what I did last night" sounds like the speaker is challening the assertion of another person.

    Although this particular sentence is a little odd, truth be told. In a situation where you didn't remember anything you did the night before, 'funny' might not be approriate. Consider this variation, however.

    1. Funny, I don't remember doing that last night

    I'm pretty sure I didn't do that last night, I think you're making it up

    2. Strange, I don't remember doing that last night

    I don't think that happened, but I might have been drunker than I thought and you might be telling the truth

    3. Weird, I don't remember doing that last night

    I must have been really drunk. (Thanks for telling me).
    Thanks Pickarooney.
    So from your example I get the feeling that the first sentence (using "funny") the sense of urgency is much stronger: I'm pretty sure I didn't do it, and not like with the others where I'm not so sure about it.

    My first instict was to think that the word "funny" lightens up the situation, but I see it's the other way around.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Native English speakers make statements like these often. When you are asking for an opinion of the sense of urgency, the speaker would need to describe his feelings with real symptoms. Funny is what they say but "peculiar" is what they mean. Pick's suspicion that drinking has a role in these expressions is what most listeners suspect.
     

    Maayan

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Native English speakers make statements like these often. When you are asking for an opinion of the sense of urgency, the speaker would need to describe his feelings with real symptoms. Funny is what they say but "peculiar" is what they mean. Pick's suspicion that drinking has a role in these expressions is what most listeners suspect.
    I see. Thanks for the comment, Harry.
     

    tomtompl

    Senior Member
    polski
    Native English speakers make statements like these often. When you are asking for an opinion of the sense of urgency, the speaker would need to describe his feelings with real symptoms. Funny is what they say but "peculiar" is what they mean. Pick's suspicion that drinking has a role in these expressions is what most listeners suspect.
    Can we use here "odd" as well? "Odd, I don't remember what I did last night" ?

    I have a sample sentence "It’s odd that she didn’t even call". Can we here replace "odd" with all above 3 mentioned adjectives, having the same meaning?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Can I put in a word for weird? I don't think it's a synonym for strange, funny or odd. For me, weird has the distinct additional meaning of unearthly, ghostly, supernatural, inexplicable...

    Being drunk to the point of oblivion may be strange, but not weird (unless some other kinds of spirits :D are involved!)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Can I put in a word for weird? I don't think it's a synonym for strange, funny or odd. For me, weird has the distinct additional meaning of unearthly, ghostly, supernatural, inexplicable...

    Being drunk to the point of oblivion may be strange, but not weird (unless some other kinds of spirits :D are involved!)
    I can't agree: current informal use, particularly amongst the younger elements, has 'weird' on a par with strange, funny and odd.

    weird (adj.) 4. a. Out of the ordinary course, strange, unusual; hence, odd, fantastic. (Freq. in recent use.)
    1855 Dickens Holly-tree Inn: Guest in Househ. Words Extra Christmas No. 5/2 He was a man with a weird belief in him that no one could count the stones of Stonehenge twice, and make the same number of them.
    1912 Eng. Hist. Rev. Oct. 833 The ‘Guacciadim’ of p. 140 is a weird misprint for Guicciardini. (OED)
     
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