Further complaints will not be entertained

fastizio

Member
Estonian
Is the sentence in the title correct? It is supposed to mean that all complaints must be filed within, say, 30 days, and if you file a complaint later, it will not be considered. I don't think the sentence I suggested is that good, but it's the best I've been able to come up with. Plus, Google says that others have used it before me (which doesnt' make it correct though). I'd really appreaciate it if you suggested your own version that sounded more natural for a native speaker. Thank you in advance for any help!

<The sentence in question is Further complaints will not be entertained. Please put the sentence you are asking about in the body of your post, not just in the title. Thank you. :) Nunty, moderator>
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    Really? It does? That's great! In my native language we have only one way to say it, so I thought it might be the case with English also. Thank you, Beryl!
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I'm afraid I disagree. To me "Further complaints will not be entertained" means that after you have filed a complaint (or a given number of complaints) you may not file any more. If we are talking about a time limit, I would prefer "Late complaints will not be entertained" or even better "No complaints will be entertained after that time".
     

    fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    Thanks for posting! Actually, I was wondering about two words in this sentence - "further" and "entertained". If "entertained" is dated, I'll use "considered". But as for "further", I'm not sure whether it conveys the exact meaning I need it to convey, it has to have the notion of lateness to it. I'm not sure if it does.
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    No, it does have the connotation of lateness. In this sentence "no further" means the same as "no more".
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I think the context in the first post is fine:
    It is supposed to mean that all complaints must be filed within, say, 30 days, and if you file a complaint later, it will not be considered.
     

    fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    So I could use "further" in this sentence even if no complaints were filed before that time, so that the "further" complaints are also the first complaints?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    No. "Further" or "more" both mean there was something to start with. But again, it is quantitative. It does not have to do with time.
     

    fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    Okey, then I will go for "No complaints will be considered after that time", as you suggested. Because what I want to say is that if you have any complaints, you must file them within 30 days (regardless of whether you file only one or several complaints), or else it will be too late and your complaint will not be considered. Thanks again for helping!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Okey, then I will go for "No complaints will be considered after that time", as you suggested. Because what I want to say is that if you have any complaints, you must file them within 30 days (regardless of whether you file only one or several complaints), or else it will be too late and your complaint will not be considered. Thanks again for helping!
    I'm always surprised at the negativity introduced into legal and semi-legal statements, especially when they're aimed at people who are presumably customers that you wouldn't want to annoy. How about going in another direction that will save you a sentence:

    Complaints will only be considered/entertained if they are filed within 30 days of [purchase/whatever].
     

    rahulbemba

    Senior Member
    English
    I think to the person it is targeted "Further complaints will not be entertained" would be understood without confusion. Listeners or readers can not be very sure about this statement when looked at in isolation.

    I think mostly it is used to denote a 'point of time' after which no new complains would be given a consideration. This 'point of time' may be either purely a time-line, e.g. from 2PM on Friday, or simply "now onwards"; or it can be dependent on an event, e.g. "after you file your first complaint" - but all are pointing towards a 'point of time'...

    The statement definitely has a authoritarian air in it. It won't be surprising to find that the person who says this would be annoyed or angry at the other. I think it is not a gentle statement to make... Because in the way I see this world, a complaint should always be entertained if sent through proper channel. Otherwise imagine this world with customer care executives using this term too often...
     

    fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    I'm always surprised at the negativity introduced into legal and semi-legal statements, especially when they're aimed at people who are presumably customers that you wouldn't want to annoy. How about going in another direction that will save you a sentence:

    Complaints will only be considered/entertained if they are filed within 30 days of [purchase/whatever].
    Thanks for the reminder, Copyright! I try to keep this in mind but I tend to forget it when I have too many other things to consider.
     

    fastizio

    Member
    Estonian
    I think to the person it is targeted "Further complaints will not be entertained" would be understood without confusion. Listeners or readers can not be very sure about this statement when looked at in isolation.

    I think mostly it is used to denote a 'point of time' after which no new complains would be given a consideration. This 'point of time' may be either purely a time-line, e.g. from 2PM on Friday, or simply "now onwards"; or it can be dependent on an event, e.g. "after you file your first complaint" - but all are pointing towards a 'point of time'...

    The statement definitely has a authoritarian air in it. It won't be surprising to find that the person who says this would be annoyed or angry at the other. I think it is not a gentle statement to make... Because in the way I see this world, a complaint should always be entertained if sent through proper channel. Otherwise imagine this world with customer care executives using this term too often...
    Thanks for posting, Rahulbemba! I agree with you, indeed it is not a gentle statement to make. I should have made it sound a bit more friendly. Unfortunately, I have no way of changing it now, it's already too late for that. I took the sentence from a contract I was translating, though I have the consolation of knowing that it was just as harsh in the source language.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top