further develop my good analytic abilities

uktous

Senior Member
cantonese
Hi

Question:
1) is my sentence idiomatic?
2) Does my sentence suggest “I want to improve something, and those things are already good and important for an accountant”?

Sentence:
I am a quick learner, and I would like to further develop my good analytic abilities which are important for an accountant.

My opinion:
I worry that “further develop something which are” is strange in English.
I believe the sentence is grammatically correct.

Thanks
 
  • cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    It's OK. It could probably do with a comma after "abilities". It may also be a good idea to leave out "good", depending on the context, as it doesn't sound overly modest to my ear.
     

    uktous

    Senior Member
    cantonese
    It's OK. It could probably do with a comma after "abilities". It may also be a good idea to leave out "good", depending on the context, as it doesn't sound overly modest to my ear.
    Hi,

    Thank you for your opinion.

    Could you please look my further question?


    Your suggested sentence:

    I would like to further develop my good analytic abilities, which are important for an accountant.

    Question:
    Is the meaning of your suggested sentence (I writie below) correct?

    Meaning of your suggested sentence:
    The willingness to develop my analytic skills is important for an accountant?

    If the meaning I write is correct:
    "Are" should be changed to "is".
    This is because "I would like to develop" is not something courtable.


    Thanks
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Regardless, you are talking about multiple skills, so are is correct.

    I used to be an industrial engineer/systems analyst, and the phrase I would use is develop strong analytical skills. Perhaps you could say that you have a natural/intuitive feel for analysis, and you would like to develop your analytical skills.

    Analytic has a more specialized meaning, primarily in math and science, and it is not used to describe a person's skills.
     

    uktous

    Senior Member
    cantonese
    No - "are" should be used because "which are" refers to analytic abilities.
    Hi,

    Thank you for your opinion.


    In my understanding:

    With a comma:
    ", which is" will refer to the whole first part of the sentence (ie, I would like tofurther develop my good analytic abilities).

    Without a comma:
    "which are" will refer to analytic abilities.


    If my understanding is correct:

    "is" should be used, if a comma is added.

    Otherwise:

    I completely misunderstood.


    Thanks
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    I would like to further develop my good analytic abilities, which are important for an accountant.
    If this is your sentence, then are is the correct form, as the non-defining relative clause refers to abilities.

    Meaning of your suggested sentence:
    The willingness to develop my analytic skills is important for an accountant?
    If this is your sentence, then is is the correct form, as the subject of the verb is willingness (singular), which must take a singular verb.
     

    uktous

    Senior Member
    cantonese
    If this is your sentence, then are is the correct form, as the non-defining relative clause refers to abilities.


    If this is your sentence, then is is the correct form, as the subject of the verb is willingness (singular), which must take a singular verb.
    Hi,

    I think these are the last s question2 that I would like to ask in this topic.

    1) Will both ", which" and "which" refer to abilities?
    2) Can they refer something else?


    If someone answer these questio, he/she can correct one of my large mistakes.

    Thanks
     

    gvergara

    Senior Member
    Español
    Hi,

    I think these are the last s question2 that I would like to ask in this topic.

    1) Will both ", which" and "which" refer to abilities?
    2) Can they refer something else?


    If someone answer these questio, he/she can correct one of my large mistakes.

    Thanks
    No, they will not always refer to abilities; it ill always depend on what comes next.

    I would like to further develop my analitical abilities, which is essential to any person who wants to be a good accountant. In this case, the non-defining relative clause refers to the whole sentence (The fact of further developing your abilities)
     
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