Future imperfective use of звать

< Previous | Next >

Dryan

Senior Member
English - Northeastern U.S.
I am trying to translate the following English sentences as a personal exercise:

"My manager’s manager was a director of engineering who we’ll call John. Up until this point, John was essentially unknown to me."

"Менеджер моего менеджера, которого мы будем звать Джон, был директором инженерных дел. До сих пор, Джон мне был практически неизвестен."

Along with any other errors I might have made, I was curious about the future imperfective use of звать and whether it would be more appropriate to simply use зовём here instead of будем звать.

As an aside, I feel like the word order for the second bolded phrase is unnatural. Should I rearrange it to be "Джон был мне практически неизвестен (неизвестным :confused:)" or is there another better option?
 
Last edited:
  • Nikined

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Does "call" here refer to the person's name? "Джон" would be in the instrumental case with "звать"
     
    Last edited:

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    которого мы будем звать Джон
    1. "которого мы будем называть Джон(ом)" (who will be referred to as John later in the text whenever we mention him)
    2. "которого мы назовем Джон(ом)" (whom we'll call John in this text)
    3. "(назовем его Джон(ом))" (enclosed in parentheses or dashes) is the most idiomatic option in Russian. (=let's call him John).
    The last two options heavily imply that "John" may not be the man's real name.

    Менеджер моего менеджера (назовем его Джон) был директором инженерного/технического отдела. До этого/того момента (or: на тот момент) я его практически не знал.
     
    Last edited:

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    "Джон" would be in the instrumental case with "звать"
    Not necessarily;):
    звать
    3.
    кого (что) кем или им. п., или (при вопросе) как. Именовать, называть.
    Отец зовёт сына Ванюшей (Ванюша). Ребёнок зовёт няню мамой.
    4. зовут, звали и (прост.) звать кого кем или им. п., или (при вопросе) как. Указывает на личное имя кого-н. Как тебя зовут (звать)? Мальчика зовут Вася (Васей). Этого человека звали Иван Иванович (Иваном Ивановичем). Зовут зовуткой, а величают уткой (ответ на вопрос об имени того, кто не хочет его назвать; разг. шутл.).

    (Словарь Ожегова и Шведовой.)
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    До сих пор, Джон мне был практически неизвестен."
    Should I rearrange it to be "Джон был мне практически неизвестен (неизвестным :confused:)" or is there another better option?
    Only неизвестен (and no comma after до сих пор).
    Both word order options are correct but have different nuances:
    Джон мне был... is neutral and "dry".
    Джон был мне... is more bookish, pertinent for aт unhurried narration.
     

    Dryan

    Senior Member
    English - Northeastern U.S.
    1. "которого мы будем называть Джон(ом)" (who will be referred to as John later in the text whenever we mention him)
    2. "которого мы назовем Джон(ом)" (whom we'll call John in this text)
    3. "(назовем его Джон(ом))" (enclosed in parentheses or dashes) is the most idiomatic option in Russian. (=let's call him John).
    The last two options heavily imply that "John" may not be the man's real name.

    Менеджер моего менеджера (назовем его Джон) был директором инженерного/технического отдела. До этого/того момента (or: на тот момент) я его практически не знал.
    Thanks! This is very useful.

    Out of curiosity, would a passive participle also be idiomatic here?
    e.g. "Менеджер моего менеджера (отныне называемый Джоном)"

    Grammatically this makes sense to me but it also feels a little heavy/awkward. I'd be inclined to translate this as "Henceforth referred to as John" and that feels a little stilted in English to me.
     

    Maroseika

    Moderator
    Russian
    Out of curiosity, would a passive participle also be idiomatic here?
    e.g. "Менеджер моего менеджера (отныне называемый Джоном)"
    No, it doesn't work here. You should have used future passive participle, because you are going to call him John henceforth. But there is no such form in Russian.
     

    Vovan

    Senior Member
    Russian
    отныне называемый Джоном
    In fact, "отныне называемый Джон(ом)" (solemn/formal/humourous) is normally a set phrase, and it means something like "whom people/I/we... recently decided to call John from then on".:D
    So, as Maroseika says, it can't be used in your context (otherwise than humourously - I'd add).
     
    Last edited:

    Eirwyn

    Member
    Russian
    Both word order options are correct but have different nuances:
    Джон мне был... is neutral and "dry".
    Джон был мне... is more bookish, pertinent for aт unhurried narration.
    I wouldn't say there's any stylistic difference here: both sentences sound equally bookish and dry. In order to make it sound casual one would have to get rid of the short adjective altogether.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top