güerita

vaa

New Member
English
Does anyone know what this means? I can't find this word "güerita...'' anywhere!
 
  • Maeron

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Try "güera" - but it's a tricky word. No wonder you were puzzled; you won't find it in http://www.wordreference.com . You need to resort to the RAE: http://buscon.rae.es/diccionario/drae.htm where you will find " (Voz indígena).
    1. adj. Méx. Dicho de una persona: Que tiene los cabellos rubios."


    Actually this definition is not quite accurate. While it may be used of someone with blond hair, in practice, any woman who is not dark-skinned may find herself called güera in Mexico. So it can actually mean anything from blonde to "not black-haired" to a light-skinned morena. The diminutive ending "-ita" is really just a way of making it more friendly; it doesn't necessarily mean "little." Also it is worth mentioning that it is not a disrespectful way to address someone. In English, it would not be so polite to call someone "Hey, blondie!"

    Personal anecdote: In the conversation at a family party, my mother-in-law said that it was odd that the garbage man called her "güerita," for she is not at all light-skinned. My brother-in-law joked, "Mom, your hearing isn't so sharp any more; he wasn't saying güerita, but 'huelita!" (short for "abuelita", in other words, "Granny") Everyone fell on the floor laughing!
     

    Antonnio

    Senior Member
    off
    Off
    The word "güera" is used in an informal way, also there are some variations like: güereja, güeraza, güerota, güerejilla...etc, etc... well, the meaning depends of the intention and intonation who said it, due in Mexico most of people are dark-skinned it's frequently that people with few education or coming from countryside use that word to expres a kind of admiration and sexual desire for a woman who looks like very beauty and who has white skin or blond hair specially if she seems to be a tourist... I say this because some time ago I met a blond woman from FL and we were friends and used to walk along Mexico city and many blokes used to say her "eeey güeriiiita"
    ..but as I said it depends of who said it...
     

    Mr. Sonora

    New Member
    Deutschland/ U.S.A - Deutsch/ English
    Anyone of darker skin can address any of lighter skin güero. The really dark mexicans call just about anyone güero, unless I'm around, then they focus on me. LOL.

    Mr. Sonora
     

    funnydeal

    Senior Member
    Mexico / Español
    Maeron said:
    Personal anecdote: In the conversation at a family party, my mother-in-law said that it was odd that the garbage man called her "güerita," for she is not at all light-skinned. My brother-in-law joked, "Mom, your hearing isn't so sharp any more; he wasn't saying güerita, but 'huelita!" (short for "abuelita", in other words, "Granny") Everyone fell on the floor laughing!
    It's a good story. I'm having a big smile, Thank you :)
     

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    Antonnio said:
    The word "güera" is used in an informal way, also there are some variations like: güereja, güeraza, güerota, güerejilla...etc, etc... well, the meaning depends of the intention and intonation who said it, due in Mexico most of people are dark-skinned it's frequently that people with few education or coming from countryside use that word to expres a kind of admiration and sexual desire for a woman who looks like very beauty and who has white skin or blond hair specially if she seems to be a tourist... I say this because some time ago I met a blond woman from FL and we were friends and used to walk along Mexico city and many blokes used to say her "eeey güeriiiita"
    ..but as I said it depends of who said it...
    Antonio, has viajado a Inglaterra, ¿ajá?

    http://english2american.com/
     

    Tormenta

    Senior Member
    Argentina-Español
    This is very interesting. When I was in México many people called me "Güerita" and I am not blonde. OK, OK, I admit, I am of a fair complexion (not in the British sense) :eek: :D However, I do have dark hair and dark eyes.

    Anyhow, I would not say that the people who called me "güerita" lacked education (at least the ones who talked to me). I asked something at the airport and this gentleman said to me " a sus órdenes Guerita" So, I guess the word güerita gives a lot of room for interpretation.

    In Costa Rica, they say " macha/o" or " machita/o" meaning blonde. When my daughter was very young we lived in Costa Rica; the first time somebody called her " Macha" she was shocked, she thought they were calling her " Macho girl" or something like that.

    Then, in Argentina we say rubio/a. So, do you speak Spanish? :D

    Tormenta:)
     

    ACQM

    Senior Member
    Spain - Spanish
    Tormenta said:
    This is very interesting. When I was in México many people called me "Güerita" and I am not blonde. OK, OK, I admit, I am of a fair complexion (not in the British sense) :eek: :D However, I do have dark hair and dark eyes.

    Anyhow, I would not say that the people who called me "güerita" lacked education (at least the ones who talked to me). I asked something at the airport and this gentleman said to me " a sus ordenes Guerita" So, I guess the word güerita gives a lot of room for interpretation.

    In Costa Rica, they say " macha/o" or " machita/o" meaning blonde. When my daughter was very young we lived in Costa Rica; the first time somebody called her " Macha" she was shocked, she thought they were calling her " Macho girl" or something like that.

    Then, in Argentina we say rubio/a. So, do you speak Spanish? :D

    Tormenta:)
    ¿Macha? ¡Eso aquí es una mula (cruce de yegua y burro)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

    Antonnio

    Senior Member
    off
    Off
    Anyhow, I would not say that the people who called me "güerita" lacked education (at least the ones who talked to me). I asked something at the airport and this gentleman said to me " a sus órdenes Guerita" So, I guess the word güerita gives a lot of room for interpretation.

    In Costa Rica, they say " macha/o" or " machita/o" meaning blonde. When my daughter was very young we lived in Costa Rica; the first time somebody called her " Macha" she was shocked, she thought they were calling her " Macho girl" or something like that.

    Then, in Argentina we say rubio/a. So, do you speak Spanish? :D

    Tormenta:)
    [/QUOTE]

    Qué si lo sabré yo :)... por eso claramente dije "..the meaning depends of the intention and intonation who said it..." "..it's frequently that people with few education or coming from countryside use that word to expres a kind of admiration..." y que bueno que te lo dijeron con educación porque a ninguna mujer le deseo encontrarse a un "vulgarcito" y que le diga una sarta de estupideces usando la palabra "güerita"... yo solamente puse uno de tantos usos que se le da y el que es muy común para las turistas que hablan en inglés y casi no entienden j de español, y agrego otra situación muy común que es cuando vas a un mercado tradicional donde se vende verdura, fruta, etc., la mayoría de los vendedores te dirán "güerita" o "güero" aunque uno esté más prieto que un frijol...jeje
     

    basurero

    Senior Member
    uk
    Antonnio said:
    la mayoría de los vendedores te dirán "güerita" o "güero" aunque uno esté más prieto que un frijol...jeje
    qué significa "aunque uno éste más prieto que un frijol"????
     

    gemela

    New Member
    English USA
    Hello everybody

    In Spain this is not such an affectionate term, but one to draw attention to the fact that someone has very fair skin. Because I'm freckled, I really don't like to hear it and be constantly reminded. I feel like in Andalucia, the Moorish South where I lived for a long time, people tend to say this to feel superior (bc they look Arabian). Even when they're joking, guera still means "empty" -- that's the original meaning. I know that some Mexicans are careful about how they say it and who they say it to. I know of fair-skinned Mexicans in the US getting teased with this term, too. There's even a song "Soy guero, y que?" (I'm a guero, and what about it?) I don't think it's that affectionate to be called "empty", but it's ok between friends, especially if they don't overthink it. Some people call each other "bit@H" and "ni66er", too, and they don't take it seriously, but you shouldn't say these words to just anybody. So, what you say about interpretation is true because it is a word that started out offensive and has turned out to be cool.
     

    Reina140

    Banned
    USA--English
    It's similar to how "gringo/a" is used. When I was at the beach this summer, there were mexicans everywhere (Ocean City, MD) and I heard one of them call us Gringos and I didn't like it. I don't like being called a foreigner in my own country and in a foreign language at that. If the original meaning of guera was "empty" . . I wouldn't want to be called that either.
     

    Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    I think that "gringo (a)" is only used to say that person is from United States o some people may say "American" (wich is not correctly used because America is a Continent so we are all americans). It's not used in a "bad" way.
    Respecto a lo de güerita en mi pais les decimos rubios, pero es definitivamente para personas bien pálidas.:)
     

    Reina140

    Banned
    USA--English
    I've heard it used in a negative manner more than once, and despite what people are thinking when they say it, the fact of the matter is it means foreign.
     

    Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    Yeah! you may be right, but there is a lot of cultural diversities and meanings for different words. So it depends on how people of diferent cultures used it. For example "everybody assumes that I'm Mexican just because " I'm hispanic" So, what I was trying to say is in my culture it is not use in a negative manner.
     

    gigizac

    Member
    American English, USA
    Reina,

    Personally, I don't think the gringo(a) is that bad. It's like catagorizing in a way. It used to be that it would bother me to be called Chicana, Latina, Hispanic. In the end I am who I am, Mexican-American along with all those other catagories.
    In your case (from your definition and use of the word) the people calling you "gringa" would be the "gringos" not you.
    I just thought that would be something to mention.
     
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