Gambling saps more strength and character

Anoukmac

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,

I have trouble understanding the verb sap combined with the use of more here.
It's the governor of Florida talking in 1959.

Gambling [...] encourages public corruption and undermines the faith of citizens in their officials. Worst of all, it saps more strength and character.

My try:

Le jeu d'argent nous vide de nos forces et met à mal notre réputation ?

I am really not sure about all of this...

Thanks for your help!
 
  • Anoukmac

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Merci, c'est vrai que ça colle. Sape nos forces et notre réputation.
    Mais est-ce bien le sens ? Je ne vois toujours pas bien ce que le "more" vient faire ici.
     

    Novanas

    Senior Member
    English AE/Ireland
    Sape nos forces et notre réputation.
    The sense of "character" here would be "caractère", as in: "It takes character to say such a thing" = "Il faut avoir du caractère pour dire une chose pareille."

    Mais est-ce bien le sens ? Je ne vois toujours pas bien ce que le "more" vient faire ici.
    I don't either. I don't see what "more" means here. It might mean "even more" --> "Worst of all and even more. . ." But I think the sentence would be better without it. I can't see that it makes much sense.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    There are several versions of this on the internet. (Go to google and search for "encourages public corruption and undermines"). "More strength" is a (recurring) typo for "moral strength".
     

    Anoukmac

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thanks again. You're right, it could be a typo. It's actually from governor Collins in 1959. But when I search this on Google, I find as many "moral strenght" as "more strenght" (about 10 each), and when I listen and watch the actor speaking, I hear "more"...
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Google will not tell you what is right or wrong. But it will tell you how many idiots keep pasting the same nonsense. "More" does not make sense.
     

    Novanas

    Senior Member
    English AE/Ireland
    Yes, "moral" makes sense. Also, since the second syllable, "-al", is unaccented, I could see how, depending on the speaker, it might not be clearly heard.
     
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