Games during our childhood/traditional ones

Discussion in 'Cultural Discussions' started by cute angel, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. cute angel Senior Member

    the universe
    Hello every body:

    Each one of us was a child one day and I'm sure he/she played some games so we want to know what kind of games do you have I mean traditional games in your countries
     
  2. Fernita

    Fernita Senior Member

    Buenos Aires-Argentina
    castellano de Argentina.
    I remember we used to play Tag, Hopscotch, Jumping rope, Hide-and-seek, to name a few.
    Oh, and marbles, too.

    I live in Argentina.
     
  3. ascension

    ascension Senior Member

    New York
    English-United States
    In New York we played pretty much the same games, with the exception of marbles. I would also add basketball.
     
  4. cute angel Senior Member

    the universe
    Please ,if you can explain for us how you play all these games because we don't know them .
     
  5. ascension

    ascension Senior Member

    New York
    English-United States
    Tag is a game with a group and one person in the group is "it." Everyone runs around and the person who is "it" tries to tag (touch) someone. When someone is tagged he then becomes "it."

    Hopscotch involves drawing numbers one the ground (usually in chalk) and jumping from one to the other.

    Hide-and-Seek also involves someone who is "it." This time everyone else in the group hides while "it" counts to a certain number. He then yells "ready or not, here I come." He then goes looking for the others. The first person to be found becomes the new "it."
     
  6. Fernita

    Fernita Senior Member

    Buenos Aires-Argentina
    castellano de Argentina.
  7. nami_nohana New Member

    barcelona
    spain (spanish and catalan)
     
  8. gurseal Senior Member

    USA Southeast
    English - USA
    And then there was the "patty cakes" sing-songy high-five-style hand-slapping thing that little girls did (and still do, I suppose). I can't remember the name. I don't even know if it can be called a game.
     
  9. gurseal Senior Member

    USA Southeast
    English - USA
    I remember that boys played cowboys and Indians. Perhaps some Canadians can speak to this game's having existed (or not) in Canada. Add to this branch of games cops and robbers. Both seem like precursors to today's laser- and paintball-style fighting.
     
  10. nami_nohana New Member

    barcelona
    spain (spanish and catalan)
    in my case, they were mud-patties, I must have been a little piggy :p
     
  11. gurseal Senior Member

    USA Southeast
    English - USA
    nami nohana, the patty cakes were rhymed lyrics--spoken, not sung--while the two girls slapped palms together. However, as you suggested in your post, making mud pies happens in lots of places.
     
  12. nami_nohana New Member

    barcelona
    spain (spanish and catalan)
    here in spain patty cakes are sung, and as you well say they are still en vogue. I saw two young girls playing them only last week.
     
  13. ascension

    ascension Senior Member

    New York
    English-United States
    This sounds a lot like "red light green light" in the US. The person who is 'it' faces a wall and says "red light green light 1 2 3." Everyone runs towards the person who is 'it' and tries to tag him. But after '3' he turns around and if he sees you running you need to go back to the beginning. The idea is to be the first person to touch the person who is 'it.'
     
  14. alexacohen

    alexacohen Banned

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Yes, here in Spain we used to play cowboys and Indians too. And pirates.

    And the ones Fernita mentioned: Tag, Hopscotch, Jumping rope, Hide-and-seek, Red light Green light (we called it "the English hide and seek, but don't ask me why).

    In fact I've been playing hide and seek with the village children last week. I won :).
     
  15. Diablo919

    Diablo919 Senior Member

    Dayton, Ohio
    US / English
    In Ohio, we played 4-square, hide and seek, Red Rover, tag, truth-or-dare, and cops and robbers at night.
     
  16. cute angel Senior Member

    the universe
    wOW really I'm surprised we have the same games we play rope_jumping,marbles;tag;hopscotch;dolls;hide and seek (cache_cache) of course with different names we play also chess but using stones or any thing else and we draw the table on a piece of wood or on the ground

    WE have also as Diablo said truth or dare''(action ou vérité) and others like playing with small bolls for girls like in the circus.

    Thakns for all of you
     
  17. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    All those games were played in Finland, too. In the wintertime we had snowball wars, of course.

    Then we had a game called Neppis race. It was an automobile race with toy cars and with very strict rules. The racing track was made of sand (or snow in wintertime), but for the heavy die-cast cars we sometimes gave the sand track a "tarmac" finish with dissolved clay that was left to dry.

    The cars were driven by a short push (a nudge?) of the crooked front finger. Too long pushes were disqualified. Usually the driver was allowed to give three pushes in a row.

    In the beginning of the fifties we used the "Dinky Toys" die-cast cars (1:43) but later (in the seventies) kids had an "official" racing car model, a plastic car looking like a Grand Prix car of the fifties. As everybody had a similar car it was only the "driving skills" that counted. The shape of the tail made the car very difficult to steer with short pushes.

    Even official Finnish Championship races were organized, controlled by adults.

    I wonder if there has been similar races in other countries.
     
  18. Sarasaki Senior Member

    Bangalore
    India - English & Kannada
    We used to play board games like Snakes and Ladders, Chinese Checkers, Mancala and Ludo

    We also played something called "Dark room". We used to turn off the lights, draw the curtains, close the door and make sure the room was as dark as possible. (We played this at night). One of us would stand outside the room and the rest would hide in the dark room. When we were ready we would call out to the one outside who had to come in, shut the door, find and identify each one correctly. The one who was caught first would be the next to go. For added effect, make funny, scary noises!

    We also played an outdoor game called "Lagori" These days kids even call it "Seven tiles". (The link says its for teenage kids, but I remember playing when I was as little as 8 years old!)

    Chain game - Similar to tag, but instead of a new "it", the person caught by "it" and "it" hold hands and run after the other kids. Each kid is caught and added to the "chain" and it goes on till the last one is caught by this "chain".

    Kutti Donne - usually played by boys using two sticks but I do not know the rules of this game.

    Pagade - Information available here

    Marbles are called "Goli"

    There are many more, but I cannot remember them all :eek:
     
  19. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    We have a different variation on "Dark room" game. This is not for kids but rather for adults:

    Everybody exept one go into hiding under a large tarpaulin. The one who's left out takes a thick piece of wood, about one metre long (a baseball bat will do), and hits hard on the tarpaulin. The one who is hit, screams of course. If he/she recognizes the voice of the person who was hit, this person has to come out and take the bat and the first hitter goes under the tarpaulin. The games goes on.

    It's not so easy to recognize the voices that come from under the tarpaulin.
     
  20. alexacohen

    alexacohen Banned

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Here in Spain it was "escondite a oscuras", "hide and seek in the dark".
     
  21. EmilyD Senior Member

    Rhode Island
    U.S., English
    One game I played as a child (but was taught to a group of us kids by an older relative and was, I suspect, more common for that generation) was: Sardines. It's easily found via google...

    One person hides...and then everyone goes in search of that person, and quietly joins that individual, until the group is squished together like sardines in a can[giggling:)]and eventually only one is left...

    Nomi
     
  22. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    We played all that, except marbles.

    My sister, who is ten years my junior, says she played all these games, too.
     
  23. nanel Senior Member

    Madrid (Spain)
    Spain (Spanish)
    Really? I knew that one as "tinieblas" (darkness).

    I remember playing the chain game too! I have no clue how it was called, but I know I've played that one. Of course we played tag, hopscotch, jump rope, hide and seek, marbles, churro, la goma (see HERE where you'll also find a lot of other games). Now I remember playing "a la zapatilla por detrás". See that same link. We also played cops and robbers.

    This stroke me as funny because we say "1 2 3, al escondite inglés" (1 2 3 to the English hide and seek). Did we all play the exact same games?
     
  24. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Well, shouldn't you at least have tried letting them win? (Just kidding. :))


    But in earnest, I played pretty much the same childrens games here in Austria in my childhood (note, this was in the seventies, before computer games were invented ;-):

    - variations of Tag, Hide & Seek, Hopscotch and others

    - there's also a variety of Hide & Seek where someone is hiding and the other children all are seeking this one person, or where one person hides a thing which other people are searching, and you help them by crying 'warm' or 'hot if they get nearer and 'cold' if they don't

    - then we played 'there flies there flies XY' (German: 'es fliegt es fliegt XY') where you keep tapping with your fingers on the table until the object = XY is mentioned: if the object is a 'flying one' (a bird, a plane, etc.) you continue tapping, if not you stop - and if you guess wrong you've lost

    - another game was 'blind cow' - 'blinde Kuh' (I haven't seen my nephews and nieces play that one, ever): someone is blindfolded and tapping around the room (or the garden), trying to catch someone who then will be blindfolded; of course children will hazard being nearly touched by the blindfolded one, and therefore, inevitably, the blindfolded person (even though at a huge disadvantage) will catch someone; this game probably never would work with adults ;)


    There were more, but I can't remember them all. You have to take into account that there wasn't much children programme on TV, then - at least not in Austria, and that we had no computer games.
     
  25. Topsie

    Topsie Senior Member

    Avignon, France
    English-UK
    In the playground at school : Hopscotch, skipping, Grandmother's footsteps,
    French Elastics, various clapping games, marbles...

    Typical birthday party games were "Pass the Parcel", "Pinning the Tail on the Donkey", "Musical Chairs", "Blind Man's Bluff", "egg & spoon race"....

    Sleeping over at friends' houses we (girls) played at "dressing-up" - this involved a lot of make-up! And then there were always the Barbie dolls and their Barbie world...
     
  26. nami_nohana New Member

    barcelona
    spain (spanish and catalan)
    I remember having played something like Neppis race here in barcelona (spain), but with bottle caps instead of cars. we used the metal caps of coke glass bottles or similar ones.

    and yes, definitely 'pica parar' is the same as 'green light red light', but the 'it' saying '1 2 3 pica parar'. I had no idea it was the same as 'escondite inglés', I had heard the name many times...

    my father, who was born in 1933, used to play wooden swords with his brother, with the added fun of being chased by the park guard: they made their swords out of tree branches! it was not so fun the day the guard caught my father, and made him drink a lot of castor oil :rolleyes:
     
  27. nami_nohana New Member

    barcelona
    spain (spanish and catalan)
    now I remembered another one which my mum loved it when she was a child, in the late 30's.

    it involves small pieces of paper with a printed drawing on it. you must put them on a table with the drawing facing down, and tap the table in order to upturn them and reveal the drawing. usually they were thematic, I mean, all of them were dolls, or butterflies, or whatever.

    not long ago I saw some of this printings in a shop, so I assume that if they still print them, somebody plays with them.

    the game must have a name but I ignore it.
     
  28. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Another one here in Austria: 'Stille Post' - literally 'silent post' where you whisper something into the ear of another child, this one whispers into the ear of the next and so on - and the last one says out loud what he or she thinks having been told by the last-but-one.

    As you can imagine, many times the word changes dramatically. (But then children also tend to provoke their neighbours not hearing properly, to make the game funnier.)
     
  29. Topsie

    Topsie Senior Member

    Avignon, France
    English-UK
    There were also several paper & pencil games:
    Someone would draw a head and fold the paper over so it was hidden then exchange with someone who would draw a body, then fold again. The next person would draw the legs and the last person the feet! (I can't remember if this game had a name!)
    Fortune-tellers were also popular!
     
  30. Topsie

    Topsie Senior Member

    Avignon, France
    English-UK
    Chinese Whispers!
     
  31. gotitadeleche Senior Member

    Texas, U.S.A.
    U.S.A. English
    In addition to most of the games already mentioned, we also played Simon Says, Mother-may-I, Pickup Sticks, and kickball. (By the way, the girls played Cowboys and Indians too. With my long hair, I thought I made a great Indian! :D)

    We also played with little plastic figures of horses, soldiers, dinosaurs, and cowboys and Indians.
     
  32. Bilma Senior Member

    USA
    Spanish Mexico
    Teléfono descompuesto :)
     
  33. sureño Banned

    Argentina
    Argentina-español
    Yes, in Argentina we had similar races too. The skill was (besides the driving of course)fixing cars for the best performance.
    I think computers and other modern games have done it sounding as obsolete nowadays.
     
  34. sureño Banned

    Argentina
    Argentina-español
    Yes, it's known as "teléfono descompuesto" in Argentina too.
     
  35. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Good to hear about this, Sureño! Did you have a special name for these races, as we say "neppis" in Finnish?

    The tune-up of the die-cast cars that I used to race was impossible. Instead, the handling of the plastic cars could be helped by cutting the body and adding weights.

    This is unfortunately true. I believe that when driving "real" toy cars one could learn some facts of the physics; in a computer race you can crash totally and go on racing (and it seems that young drivers on the roads think that it's same in real life).
     
  36. sureño Banned

    Argentina
    Argentina-español
    We called it just “jugar a los autitos” (small cars playing) or “carreritas” (small racings)

    Yes it was what we did. We also changed the wheels in order to improve its performance and stuff like that. In addition, we spent a lot of time building the car tracks.
    In contrast, children nowadays have the more realistic toy cars; but all things are offered to them done. They can’t develop their creativity and therefore they look bored, unenthusiastic.
    I’m sure that we, with our poor things, enjoyed very much and better than they are enjoying these amazing modern toys.
     
  37. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    I know this game too! We called it "broken telephone". And it's still played by kids.
     
  38. kyrin New Member

    Shanghai, China
    China|Shanghainese
    We play exactly the same games here... Does anyone also play "Chicken and Eagle"?

    At the beginning, one chosen player is chosen to be the EAGLE. Another is chosen to be the HEN. The rest are CHICKEN. CHICKEN hide in line behind HEN and hold the shoulders of his(her) preceding player with both hands. EAGLE tries to capture the CHICKEN at the end of the line and the HEN tries to block the EAGLE from her children.:)
     
  39. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    Well, here in Austria I fear real mobile phones already have begun to replace this game.

    Same seems to be true for many other of our childhood games; some are still played, yes, but not nearly as often as we once did.
     
  40. Etcetera

    Etcetera Senior Member

    St Petersburg, Russia
    Russian, Russia (St Petersburg)
    That's very true. When I was in my sister's age, I spent more time outdoors than she does now. There were computer games already in my childhood, but they weren't so widespread.
     
  41. Nanon

    Nanon Senior Member

    Entre Paris et Lisbonne
    français (France)
    It has - it can be called an "exquisite corpse" ("cadavre exquis" in French). It is said to have been invented by Surrealists. They played the game with words, sometimes with drawings too, and the first sentence they created was beginning with "The exquisite corpse"...
    We used to play this game with drawings, questions and answers or whole sentences (showing only the last word).

    About paper games - we played rock-paper-scissors, too.
    About word games - there was one in which the words "yes" and "no" (alternatively "yes, no, white and black") had to be avoided when answering questions.

    This game is called "Arab telephone" in French!...
    Why Arab? A classical explanation says that Arabs are supposed to use oral communication more than writing. I fear there might be a racist connotation to this name, though :mad: (Arabs were suposed to be illiterate in French - there may be also a syllogism here: words lose their meaning in oral communication, Arabs use oral communication, therefore Arabs talk nonsense!)

    Back to the topic :eek:: the corresponding article in the French Wikipedia lists several translations for this game.
     
  42. Chaska Ñawi

    Chaska Ñawi Senior Member

    an old Ontario farmhouse
    Canadian English
    We played many of the games named above - Red Rover, Cowboys and Indians, Sardines, and such as kids. Sometimes we played quiet games like Rock Paper Scissors, but mostly we were on the move.

    Fox and Geese is one that hasn't been mentioned yet. You stamp out a big spoked wheel in the snow. It's a kind of tag, where the geese may move anywhere in the wheel, while the fox is restricted to the rim.

    Back when hay bales were rectangular and stackable, instead of the giant things they've become, we made amazing forts, accessible only by secret tunnels, through the hay mows. Everybody had forts. The kids who didn't have barns had their forts in trees, in thickets of prickly ash, or under the verandas if necessary. In the winter, everybody had a snow fort. We stockpiled our ammunition and had regular snowball fights. These days the forts remain a part of school life, but the snowballs have been banned.

    Being Canadians, we also played a LOT of hockey. We played road hockey, pond hockey, parking lot hockey, and driveway hockey. In addition to pucks, we used tennis balls, baseballs, road apples (frozen horse poop) and anything else that could be depended on to slide nicely over the ice. This is one feature of Canadian life that has not changed (except for the availability of road apples).
     
  43. alexacohen

    alexacohen Banned

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Yes, really. Andalucia is still part of Spain.

    We didn't get snow by the sea, what we played was a run against the waves. When the wave receded we followed it, and the one who stayed longer at the border of the water before another wave struck was the winner.

    I shoud have said the one who stayed longer at the border of the water without getting his/her feet wet was the winner. However, I know of no one who ever accomplished that.

    I should have said, too, that the game was played in winter after school - while we were still wearing our school clothes. That was the fun.
     
  44. Sarasaki Senior Member

    Bangalore
    India - English & Kannada
    I can say the same about cricket - we call it "galli cricket" (Galli = lane)and its played by all boys since the time they start walking :D. Galli cricket does not need a playground. A small lane/road, driveway....whatever.....
     
  45. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    We did that too - only that hay here in Austria wasn't (and, mainly, still isn't) stacked in bales but loose: we 'dug' our tunnels and caves into huge haystacks.
    We also had kind of a 'fort' - more precisely, a small hut in a wood nearby (we even asked the owner for permission). There was even kind of a 'war' with the 'fort/hut' of neighbouring children (in the course of which our hut finally was destroyed; the cowardly neighbour kids did so on a day we weren't on watch).

    Nowadays parents are discouraging that much initiative in their kids, they're too worried something might happen to them in haystacks or huts outside; instead many parents in rural Austria [obviously, in cities you couldn't build huts anyway, it wouldn't be allowed to do so in public parks] give their children substitute mini huts in the backyard where the kids stay close to them and are more easily supervised.

    But the caution of today's parents really is understandable to a degree, if I am looking back - those days really were a little bit wild, I'd say.
     
  46. alexacohen

    alexacohen Banned

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    My children and my next-field neighbour's children have exactly the same hut under a tree near the brook.
    Of course their hut is much better constructed and much better situated than the hut built by the silly children from the village at the other side of the brook.

    I can't judge, because adults are forbidden there.

    It seems country kids haven't changed that much.
     
  47. Zsanna

    Zsanna ModErrata

    Hungary
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Let me join with some Hungarian memories to this cheerful topic!
    We played most of the classic games mentioned (hide and seek, hopscotch, skipping rope, ball games, mud pies, etc.) and probably most of you played also cat's cradle, and sleighing (in winter) and one that I liked a lot (an individual game):
    firstly, you had a drawn picture of a girl/woman (sometimes you had a whole family) cut out from a tough cardboard "whom" you "dressed" with cut out dresses fitting the figure (by little flaps you could fold around the figure so that the dress doesn't drop). The whole kit was sold individually, you just had to cut it out and it was ready to be played with!
    I don't know whether others did it but after a time I drew, coloured, cut out all the dresses myself, later even the figures themselves. (That way I could present dresses from different angles!)

    And a group game nobody mentioned yet so I don't know how typically Hungarian it may be, called "Give (us) soldiers, king!" (= Adj király katonát!).
    We played it especially in the schoolyard and I always found it slightly barmy, nevertheless it involved some "energy-spending" so kids liked it.
    It went like this:
    Kids formed two, facing lines by standing one next to the other, holding their neighbour's hand on both sides. The game started off with a dialogue between the two lines (one representing the "king", the other well ... I don't really know who, say the claimers?):
    claimers:Give (us) soldiers, king!
    king: No, I won't!
    claimers: If you don't, I'll "tear" one.
    king: Tear, if you can!
    claimers: Who do you wish?
    king: (the line had to name somebody from the other line)

    The chosen person dashed madly at the "king's line" and tried to break the chain of holding hands between two kids he thought it would be easiest (by bashing at the two holding hands with his own).
    If he managed (to "tear" somebody "out" from the king's line), he could take that person (he had to say which of the hand owners he wanted) with him to the other line which then became the king's line for the next round. If he did not manage to break the holding hands he bashed, the line he came from stayed the "claimers' line". I think. And the whole thing went on until one of the lines ran out of kids holding hands.

    I gave all these details just in case someone recognises it.

    Hakro, that game you mentioned, when you had to find out who you bashed under the tarpaulin, did it really exist? It sounds more like a joke!
    Otherwise there was something like you racing car competition among boys in Hungary, too. I have vague memories seeing plain wooden boards with real (little) wheels attached to them somehow, however, there was no track building involved.
     
  48. Hakro

    Hakro Senior Member

    Helsinki, Finland
    Finnish - Finland
    Sure the game existed, but it was practically impossible to find anybody to play it.
     
  49. sokol

    sokol Senior Member

    Vienna, Austria; raised in Upper Austria
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    It's "Der Kaiser schickt Soldaten aus" - "Caesar (The Emperor) sends his soldiers"*) in Austria and it was (and probably still is) very common, we played it often at home (but not in the schoolyard); the dialogue I don't remember any more, but I think it was rather similar to the Hungarian one.
    *) You certainly would know that Hungary once had a king, while Austria had an emperor (even though both king and emperor were the same persons), but for the benefit of persons not familiar with the history of the Austrian-Hungarian Habsburg monarchy I add that piece of information which seems for me the reason for choosing king in Hungary but emperor in Austria.

    (Your dressing game I don't remember, I surely didn't play it - but then I'm a boy, in my times you couldn't possibly play that sort of game and not become laughed at - but I think my sisters neither did.)
     
  50. Chaska Ñawi

    Chaska Ñawi Senior Member

    an old Ontario farmhouse
    Canadian English
    The children here still play this game; it's called Red Rover. The children from one side call, "Red Rover, Red Rover, we call Anna over!" and then Anna has to run at the other team. Strategies involved calling over the other team's weakest person, or maintaining an inviting-looking gap between two of your strongest players until it was too late for the opposition to change course.
     

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