garden/yard

aurehen

Senior Member
Mexico-Español
Hola otra vez a todos.

Mi pregunta es ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre yard y garden? Según entendí en otro post no tiene nada que ver si tiene o no concreto; entonces ¿cuál es la diferencia?

Gracias
 
  • Cata Marca

    Senior Member
    English/Spanish - USA/Argentina
    A yard usually means just having an open area covered with grass (sometimes just dirt). A yard could also mean the "backyard"= the outdoor area behind (or sometimes on the side) of the house.

    A garden usually means an area where there are many plants (herbs, flowers, shrubs, bushes, etc) It could also be a "rock garden", which is an area with decorative rocks, or rocks placed there in a pleasing and purposeful manner.

    I hope this helps. Saludos
     

    cirrus

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Coincido con los demás pero hay una diferencia entre el uso británico y americano. Muchas veces se dice yard en EEUU donde aquí diríamos garden. En BE yard es un lugar sin cesped, preferentemente detrás del edificio sobre todo cuando se trata de un back yard.
     

    lforestier

    Senior Member
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English

    Paul Clancy

    Senior Member
    Ireland, English
    In Ireland we would not refer to a garden as a yard. In Ireland a garden would have grass, flowerbed, plants, patio, etc perhaps a combination of all of these or perhaps just simply laid out in lawn. A yard on the other hand is usually quite a small space usually to the back or side of a house with little room to have anything other than perhaps a few flower pots and maybe at a stretch a patio table and chairs. It would not have grass it would be concrete or paved in some way. A school yard would be concrete also and would not have grass either.

    In Ireland we understand the saying "not in my back yard", but we would be more likely to say "not on my turf" or "not on my patch" instead. From the contributions from forum members on this topic, it appears that garden and yard can be used interchangeably in the US to mean one and the same thing. Interesting!.
     

    lforestier

    Senior Member
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    Actually, it's not interchangeable. A yard can be set-up as a garden or a garden be part of the yard design. A yard can be a lawn or paved over. Like Paul mentioned, a School yard is usually concrete and is called that in the US. The Indianapolis Raceway is nicknamed The Brickyard because it's paved with bricks.
     

    emaestro

    Senior Member
    English - USA Native
    I agree with Barbara S..

    In American English (at least Mid-western usage) a garden is a place set apart especially to grow something. It could be a flower garden, a vegetable garden, an herb garden, a rock garden, a cactus garden, etc. It might also contain some fruit trees and fruit bearing bushes.

    In certain cases, it could be a “formal garden” which is “a neat and ordered garden laid out in carefully planned geometric and symmetric lines.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formal_garden. In this case it might contain grassy areas.

    Since most middle-class Americans never have a formal garden, the common AE understanding of a garden is that: a yard can contain a garden, but a garden can not contain a yard.
     

    bondia

    Senior Member
    English-England
    It probably varies by region. For me, a garden would have at least grass and probably flowers. Whereas a yard might only be concreted and only hold e.g. rubbish bins.

    I think the Americans use "yard" and the British use "garden" , or maybe it is just because the British are more into flowers, hehe :p

    I think you're both right.
    In BrE, a backyard is as Cheeky-Monkey describes, and is generally understood as being an enclosed space. In AmE (as in "not-in-my-backyard") I believe that there can also be grass, flowers, trees etc., but a native AmE speaker should confirm this.:)
     

    Jane Mango

    New Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with jinti - a garden is a "piece of yard." Yard can also be a general term for both as in: "I am going to work in the yard this weekend," i.e. cut the grass, plant flowers etc.
     

    bondia

    Senior Member
    English-England
    I agree with jinti - a garden is a "piece of yard." Yard can also be a general term for both as in: "I am going to work in the yard this weekend," i.e. cut the grass, plant flowers etc.

    It all depends on where Bella Swan wants to translate, or use, these terms. If it's for BrE, definitely "garden";)
     
    Top