1. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Could it be that these words have a different (underlying) focus: garder more on keeping, holding (and consequently but secondly keeping from), guard more explicitly on the defense aspect? That guard implicitly refers to threat, dangers, more than garder?

    I am not a native speaker of either, but I suppose a 1-to-1 translation would in general not work, or would it?
     
  2. CarlosRapido

    CarlosRapido Senior Member

    Québec - Canada
    français - English (Can)
    Your assessment is basically correct, and no, a direct translation doesn't work...they are what we call faux amis.
     
  3. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    Thanks.. Just wanted to check whether my intuition was correct...
     
  4. Keith Bradford

    Keith Bradford Senior Member

    Brittany, NW France
    English (Midlands UK)
    Very, very simply:

    Garder = to keep
    Protéger = to guard

    There are of course a myriad of exceptions, depending on context.
     
  5. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I just thought they are simply close because one focuses on the effect and the other on the measures taken to ensure the effect... Guard from for example seems common to me, but not garder de... But I am not a native speaker... I'd love to hear about this...
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013

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