garder la pêche

poireau

Senior Member
English, USA
Moderator note: multiple threads have been merged to create this one.

What is the equivalent in english of
"Gardez la peche"?

Merci
 
  • poireau

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    In a French newscast the reporter says at the end "Gardez la peche" (France2.fr)

    "Keep fit"? It doesn't make sense to me.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What is the equivalent in english of
    "Gardez la peche"?

    Merci
    hi poireau - literally it means "stay feeling great!" but you just wouldn't say that in English. It's one of those many situations in which there is no direct translation. The closest I can think of would be, "Have a great day!"
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    Gardez la pêche
    Could be rendered in a few different ways :
    keep (beeing) in good shape/fit
    keep up the good work (depending on context)

    One possibility about the origin of this expression could be that it is coming from avoir un teint de pêche (to look like a peach), peach, with its colors, being linked with good health.
     

    éruditnaissant

    New Member
    America English
    Je cherchais ce mot sur WordReference, mais, je trouvais seulement les mots «fish» et «sin» pour traduisait. Je pense que c’est qqc comme «Watch yourself», mais je suis sûr que ce n’est pas ça.
     

    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    It should be "la pêche" (peach (the fruit))
    You could also say:
    "Garde la frite / la patate / (la banane) = la forme

    [...]
     

    eatfood

    New Member
    English (American)
    Bonjour,

    Alors, je regardais une video-clip par un rappeur francais qui s'appelle "Booba" et il a une chanson "Garde La Peche". Est-ce que la phrase "keep staying fit" s'applique? Merci.
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Bonjour,

    Alors, je regardais une video-clip par un rappeur francais qui s'appelle "Booba" et il a une chanson "Garde La Peche". Est-ce que la phrase "keep staying fit" s'applique? Merci.
    Non. Mais 'keep well' se dit, si assez rarement.
     

    Philip(pe)

    Senior Member
    English - US; Russian
    Won't speak for the French, but "Keep staying fit" doesn't sound right in English. It's either "keep fit" or "stay fit."

    A somewhat thread-related question. In English we can ask, "What do you do to stay fit?" (i.e. what exercise) Can one ask in French, "Comment fais-tu pour garder la pêche?" Est-ce que ca va? Sinon, redites le correctement s.v.p. Merci.
     

    madolo

    Senior Member
    Won't speak for the French, but "Keep staying fit" doesn't sound right in English. It's either "keep fit" or "stay fit."

    A somewhat thread-related question. In English we can ask, "What do you do to stay fit?" (i.e. what exercise) Can one ask in French, "Comment fais-tu pour garder la pêche?" Est-ce que ca va? Sinon, redites le correctement s.v.p. Merci.
    yes it's correct (though "la pêche" being rather informal, "comment tu fais ..." sounds more natural)
    "qu'est-ce que tu fais pour garder la forme ?" is a litteral translation and sounds very natural too
     

    Spleen

    Senior Member
    USA English
    At the end of a news broadcast, it could be : Have a good one! All the other ideas in English wouldn't match : Stay fit, stay in shape, etc. (in my opinion, OF COURSE!)
     

    Teafrog

    Senior Member
    UK English (& rusty French…)
    I'm surprised, as I always thought that "avoir la pêche" meant "to be in good spirit", to look at life with a positive outlook, rather than the physical "keep fit" (avoir la forme). :confused:

    By extension, therefore, "garder la pêche" would mean "keep one's spirits up", but I would like to get confirmation on this, as this meaning hasn't been put forward :confused:. BTW, our ancestors said, "keep one's pecker up" :D

    As David314 said, we use a similar term "to feel peachy", for feeling good.
     

    Spleen

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'm surprised, as I always thought that "avoir la pêche" meant "to be in good spirit", to look at life with a positive outlook, rather than the physical "keep fit" (avoir la forme). :confused:

    By extension, therefore, "garder la pêche" would mean "keep one's spirits up", but I would like to get confirmation on this, as this meaning hasn't been put forward :confused:. BTW, our ancestors said, "keep one's pecker up" :D

    As David314 said, we use a similar term "to feel peachy", for feeling good.

    I agree: "Keep your spirits up" is the idea. I was just trying to stay in the broadcast situation and I can't imagine a speaker saying anything else... Of course, after listening to the news, it would be a good idea to say "Keep the faith" or something like that :D
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In the UK only religious people or people working on a joint project would be likely to say 'keep the faith' and it would mean 'stay faithful to your religion, god or project'. I can't imagine any broadcaster here saying 'keep your spirits up' - this is something an individual is more likely to say (eg to a friend who is in trouble). Something we do say here when saying goodbye is 'look after yourself'.
     

    Spleen

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I totally agree, as I seriously can't image anything other than: "Have a good day" or, in the US, "Have a good one".
    "Keep the faith" in the US in another context would be like "Keep the spirit"... etc. but certainly not in this context.
     

    hihan

    Member
    french
    hi poireau - literally it means "stay feeling great!" but you just wouldn't say that in English. It's one of those many situations in which there is no direct translation. The closest I can think of would be, "Have a great day!"

    an american friend of mine always ends his e-mails to me with

    ' keep on rocking dude!'

    which I 've always assumed to mean 'garde la pêche'

    'avoir la pêche' = not to be depressed = (?) Be happy ...? ...,(remember this song : Don't worry, be happy...?)
     

    WaddupDawg

    New Member
    Français - France
    Moderator note: multiple threads have been merged to create this one.

    What is the equivalent in english of
    "Gardez la peche"?

    Merci

    hey guys , I'm french and I know the actual meaning , we use it each day where I live .

    Well actually when somebody is encounters a pretty discouraging situation , his friends can tell him "Garde la pêche" garde = keep , la pêche = the morale or stuff like that . so when you say that , you tell him not to be sad , "et de garder la pêche mon gars !" . Although don't use it for important events , 'cause when you say that , you kinda laugh at him , it sounds kinda ironic in my ear if you see what I mean . Some people (like my brother) use it as a goodbye formule .

    I hope you're enlightened , keep the peach !
     

    v2v

    New Member
    Français
    Hi there;

    First of all you got to acknoledge "Gardes la peche" is some kind of a slang word once used somewhere in a french area called "Haut de Seine", Booba's area by the way which is why he choose it for his anthemn.

    Unlike a swiss-knife, this quotable is multi-tasking. As far as its meaning in Booba's song - assuming of course it was what you seek starting this all thread - it means "What ever" or "Who cares". It's quite ironic actually.

    This being said, some of us use - only a few one - it in order to cheer up someone sad for instance.

    Here you go. Voilà.
     

    AuntyD

    Banned
    BE-flavoured Cdn/NA English
    Only we who were there in the sixties would remember 'Keep the faith' as something said by completely non-religious people. :)

    Keep the faith, baby!

    (... which then grew a twin: Keep the baby, Faith!)

    'Keep the faith, baby' was most commonly said by Black activists in the United States, and most famously by Adam Clayton Powell.

    You can also find Tony Bennett and k.d. lang singing the song of that title on youtube.

    Here we are: dictionary . reference . com /browse/keep+the+faith+%28baby%29!

    'stay encouraged and positive'

    It is something that someone from our era would say today, if somewhat sardonically, and might well be used as a radio/television host's sign-off. But that doesn't make it the best choice, here, of course.
     

    nereee

    New Member
    French
    Hi there,

    I had to create an account to step in the thread because so far no one (except for v2v) actually transcribed the accurate meaning of this expression in today's context, and if anyone would translate it to "keep the peach", it would still be better than all preceding suggestions.

    Nowadays, "garde la pêche", colloquial expression popularized by the rapper Booba with his album "Ouest Side", is mostly used by young people in French urban areas with a strong sarcastic connotation.

    It would most probably be translated as "keep dreamin 'bout it" or more directly, "go fuck yourself".

    For examples, you can refer to Booba's lyrics:
    "Tu veux baiser sans sucer bouffonne ? Garde la pêche !" (u poor girl expects to fuck without sucking it first? Garde la pêche !)
    "Au lieu d'la vendre tu la sniffes : garde la pêche !" (Instead of selling it, you snore it? Garde la pêche !)
    "Tu voudrais que j'taffe pour le SMIC ? Garde la pêche !" (Working for minimum wage? Garde la pêche !)

    I'm not living in France anymore, but I can think that most probably no one over 50 years old will understand the sarcastic connotation.
    I hope my post gives a better understanding of this expression, so you can use it in any situation as you see fit.

    neRe'
     
    Last edited:

    avago

    Senior Member
    English (Australian)
    Ouah. Just heard this today on radio. (July 2020.. my city is just returning to lockdown mid Co-vid19 story. ) Spoken at the end of French radio broadcast. (Gardez la pêche.. et à demain !) I am pretty sure it related to keeping up morale. Would be confident a reasonable English equivalent (given context) would be "Stay strong!" (Not physically, in terms of morale or maybe wholistically). I love this 🍑 peachy expression .. either as admonition (Gardez la pêche) or description. (Elle a la pêche aujourd'hui.)
     
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