Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it

ktm

Senior Member
Can anybody explain the meaning of the phrase "Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it" in the context as follows:

'What did you see when you entered her study?'
'Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it. She had her desk lamp on so it shone on her. I knew quickly something awful had happened.
 
  • Victoria32

    Senior Member
    English (UK) New Zealand
    Can anybody explain the meaning of the phrase "Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it" in the context as follows:

    'What did you see when you entered her study?'
    'Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it. She had her desk lamp on so it shone on her. I knew quickly something awful had happened.
    It means that the speaker saw something which startled and upset her, "gave (her) a bit of a turn" means it made her feel faint, a bit ill maybe.

    Vicky
     

    Hocuspocus

    Member
    Français Belgique
    Here is how I understand it: the man who entered the room saw something horrible that made him turn his head to avoid a disgusting sight. "Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it" = "I admit I was disgusted"
     
    Can anybody explain the meaning of the phrase "Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it" in the context as follows:

    'What did you see when you entered her study?'
    'Gave me a bit of a turn, I don't mind admitting it. She had her desk lamp on so it shone on her. I knew quickly something awful had happened.

    Hi ktm,

    "To have a turn" is a British colloquialism, much loved of female hypochondriacs.

    "Leave me alone just now dear. I need to lie down. I can feel one of my turns coming on."

    As Victoria said, it is a feeling of being unwell, sick or faint.

    Anyone seeing something awful would suffer "a bit of a turn".

    In other words, "I don't mind telling you, what I saw made me feel quite ill."



    Regards,
    LRV
     
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