gave one tug and out come

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passengerman

Senior Member
chinese
Hi all;

What does the bold phrase mean? Could you explain?

Then one proud lady Miss Powis, fell into the fire which lit the dark forest. ... All the animals tried to pull her out...

Then Mr. Woracabro gave one tug and out come Miss Powis. What a mess she wos She looked very sad but limped to a swamp...

Thanks in advance,

Fun with the language book 4
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Here's a link to the book which is the most staggeringly awful I have ever come across. If mistakes were a fatal disease symptom it would be long dead (assuming that the online version is identical the real text).
    Fun With Language Book 4.doc | Rice | Seedling
    The quote is from a Guyanan folk tale about a group of animals playing instruments. Presumably, it's British Guyana which is on the north west coast of South America.
    One of the consistent typos throughout the text is the replacement of letter A by letter O, so it's hard to say if 'come' is wrong or a typo for 'came', and the same goes for 'wos' and 'was'. Oh dearie me.
    (Sometimes this is rather funny, like the British 'gendarme' speaking French in Hallo! Hallo!
    For instance, ' they were ploying cricket')

    'Come' should be 'came' and 'wos' should be 'was'.

    The story is on page' 24 of 177' but pasting a copy results in this sort of thing, pretty well illegible.

    "ne night Mr. Woraca%ro he$+ a part in the orest un+er a %u$$et
    /oo+ tree. &$$ the ani,a$s /ere in#ite+. Mr. Waraca%ra hire+ t/o
    ,usicians to p$o or his part. The ,usicians /ere a %ig cra% an+
    Some of the book is passable. Why would it have so much about Guyana of all places?
     
    Last edited:

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The quote is from a Guyanan folk tale about a group of animals playing instruments. Presumably, it's British Guyana which is on the north west coast of South America.
    One of the consistent typos throughout the text is the replacement of letter A by letter O, so it's hard to say if 'come' is wrong or a typo for 'came', and the same goes for 'wos' and 'was'. Oh dearie me.
    At the beginning, there are Uncle Remus stories. That dialect would certainly be expected in the original versions of those stories such as:
    I wuz stan’in’ dat away in de aidge er de woods lookin’ out cross a clearin’, w’en—piff!out come a little bunch er blue smoke fum de top er wunner dem big lonesome-lookin’ pines, en den—pow!
    That said, there do seem to be a lot of OCR errors - Mr Woracabro is also Mr Woracabra, etc.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The 'Uncle Remus' stories written in 'eye' (a representation of how a dialect is spoken)* can't be at all helpful to Chinese students of English.

    I remember a very long time ago, the excruciation of having to read something about a 'tar baby', and 'Brer Rabbit' maybe, was it. I think it was supposed to be funny.
    It's very important for learners to hear English spoken in a variety of accents, but it's beyond me why anyone should be subjected to extremes of written dialect until they are almost at native speaker fluency levels and can enjoy 'correcting' it.
    I would not have appreciated being exposed to French or German dialect
    when I was struggling to learn the basics of the standard language.
    I'd love to know more about the origin and rationale of this book.

    What are 'OCR' errors, please?

    * I'm not sure how to use this 'eye' word.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    What are 'OCR' errors, please?
    A lot of copyrighted material is available on the Internet that has been scanned using optical character reading software. This software often makes mistakes like turning 'a' into 'o' or 'rn' into 'm', etc. If the result is a correctly spelled word, there's not even an error. In this case, as you say, it's impossible to tell if this is dialect or simply 'o's turned into 'a's as this is probably a simplified version of folk tales that were originally in a dialect which would use "out come" and "wos".
     

    passengerman

    Senior Member
    chinese
    "out came someone" is a dialect or an inverted saying of "someone came out" ?

    For example,

    A- What did you do yesterday?
    B- Out went I.

    This is a possible using? :rolleyes:
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    For example,

    A- What did you do yesterday?
    B- Out went I.

    This is a possible using? :rolleyes:
    No, that really doesn't work, I'm afraid.

    That particular form of inversion is a slightly old-fashioned literary style which we wouldn't really use in everyday modern English.

    You could conceivably have something like:
    "There was a knock at the door and out I went to see who was there" but even that sounds a bit contrived.

    It's probably one of these things to just recognize when you come across them, but not try and use. :(
     
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