gear out of the boot

waiphyo

Senior Member
singapore
This is from Ian Fleming's "For your eyes only" novel that I don't understand the whole sentence underlined.
Please explain to me!!!
Thanks in advance!!!

"Now this is where you’ve got to get things right. Make it that you get to
Frelighsburg around three a.m. Garage-hand’ll be half asleep and you’ll be
able to get the gear out of the boot and move off without him noticing even if
you were a double-headed Chinaman."
 
  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    you'll be able to remove the equipment (?) from the boot (AE trunk) of the car...
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    We can't proofread whole sentences so I will answer your question about 'gear out of the boot'. Gear = stuff/equipment (without futher context I do not know exactly what we are talking about) , boot is the 'trunk' of a car in AE (the space in the back of a car where you can store things).
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Gear" can mean "equipment", but we BE speakers wouldn't refer to a car as "the gear". I can't picture a "booth" in a garage either. So I agree with Hildy and lc that this "boot" is the equivalent of AE "trunk".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I was possibly misled by the Urban slang dictionary definition
    "
    Gear
    In British slang it means ride(car)"
    Yes - there is one vote for that definition (the person who wrote it) and 14 against (including mine). Tip on using Urban Dictionary -> it is usually quite good but only take the first few entries as being likely to be accurate.:thumbsup:
    and by thinking that "booth" could refer to the place where the attendant would have been asleep...
    :oops: I see why you might have thought that, but, "No - that's not possible." The conversation is normal - no really hidden meanings or misprints just British English.:)
     

    puli_dog

    Senior Member
    Thanks to all for clarifying:)
    Mine was evidently a case of “stubborn researcher syndrome” affecting people elaborating suggestive (at least for themselves) theories built on tenuous premises and thus bound to overlook all the evidences denying their assumptions in favour of every tiny clue that best suits their vision..
     
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    puli_dog

    Senior Member
    :D Can you get a grant to study it?
    OT:

    Yes, I probably could, :D thanks to the countless occasions I’ve been stricken by it and the resulting skill I’ve built in recognizing its symptoms (but, alas, always when it’s too late…) and also for having knowledge of many examples of scientists that even came to tweak their experiment’s results in a -delusional rather than dishonest- desperate attempt to prove their theories, product of feverish years-long pursuance, were true :)
     
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