gear [two engaging wheels / single wheel]

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serbring

Member
Italiano
Hi all,

I need to write a scientific paper about gears. I know that the word gear may be used both for a machine composed of two engaging wheels (Gear - Wikipedia) and the single wheel. Is there any unique way to distinguish the words so not misunderstanding may occur in the text?

thanks
 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    I usually apply the term to one wheel only, calling the combination of two or more engaging wheels a "gear train."
    By the way, the wiki you cited (and its links) should give you a plethora of information.
     
    Last edited:

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    You might use gearwheel for the single item and gear train or set of gears for the multiple item.

    There is also the word cogwheel; this is more common in older mechanical constructions than in modern vehicle transmission systems.
     

    serbring

    Member
    Italiano
    I have another doubt, the transmission has different ratios. In literature, the term gear is often adopted for this meaning. Here again a misunderstanding may occur. Any suggestion?

    Thanks
     

    serbring

    Member
    Italiano
    I don't think a reader will think you mean this, as long as you aren't talking about driving a car. There are several meanings to "gear" but the context makes it clear.

    Look at definition 1 in the WR dictionary to see both the ME meaning and the car meanings:

    gear - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    My doubt is to making the context clear enough. For example: "gearwheels of higher gears lead to higher loads to the transmission because the maximum engine torque can be delivered. It doesn't sound me really clear and the word "gear" is overly repeated, right?
     

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    My doubt is to making the context clear enough. For example: "gearwheels of higher gears lead to higher loads to the transmission because the maximum engine torque can be delivered. It doesn't sound me really clear and the word "gear" is overly repeated, right?
    A mere two uses of a word is not overly repetitious in this context.

    But "gearwheels of higher gears lead to higher loads..." makes little sense to me.
     

    serbring

    Member
    Italiano
    A mere two uses of a word is not overly repetitious in this context.

    But "gearwheels of higher gears lead to higher loads..." makes little sense to me.
    when you drive a car and the 1st gear is engaged, tyres can slip with a little gas. When the 2nd gear is engaged, tires can still slip but with more gas than with the 1st gear. When the 3rd is engaged, tires cannot slip anymore so you can push the throttle pedal to the uppermost position so higher gearwheel loads occur in the 3rd than in the 2nd or 1st. Hopefully, it is more clear.

    thanks
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The problem there isn't the repetition of "gear" (that is absolutely inevitable), it's the sentence construction. Try:
    "When higher gears are engaged, the gearwheels transmit higher loads to the transmission because the maximum engine torque can be delivered."
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    "gearwheels of higher gears..." is confusing: different meanings of "gear" are used 3 words away from each other, and in the same noun phrase.

    You can use "driving in low gear" and "driving in high gear" for the manually-selected driving. Also, "gearwheels" should be "combinations of gearwheels": in the phrase "gearwheels of higher gears" the word "gearwheels" is singular (one gearwheel for each gear).

    So I suggest "the combination of gearwheels used when driving in high gear".

    The sentence still made little sense to me, until you explained in post #9 that:

    1 - at lower gears, "flooring the pedal" will cause tire slipping
    2 - at higher gears, "flooring the pedal" does not slip the tires, so max engine torque can apply acceleration

    In other words, the sentence is only talking about the situation when "the driver floors the pedal" in low vs. high gear. That is important.

    Here's a version of the sentence that includes all the information, with unambiguous wording for "gear":

    The combination of gearwheels used when driving in high gear allows the driver to "floor the pedal", applying the full maximum engine torque to accelerating the car. "Flooring the pedal" when in low gear results in tire slippage.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You have a "driving gear" and a "driven gear". There is a "sun wheel" centered between two or more other gears. There is a rack and pinion gear.

    I think the simplest way is to supply an illustration labeling the gears as 'A', 'B', 'C', etc.
     
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