Gender, OBJ+POS: person->(his-him/her,their), one->(????)

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josama

Senior Member
Colombia, Spanish
Hi, I have this question:

When someone is speaking or writing in general, he/she (they?), writes: someone, or a person, or one as the subject of the phrase. For avoiding the male/female problem, some people accept the use of their/them, for example:


If a person enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.

1. Is the same if you don't use 'person', but, for example 'someone' or 'one'?:

If someone enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.

If one enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.

2. Would any of the expressions in green be suitable in those phrases?

Thank you guys.
 
  • VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    josama said:
    When someone is speaking or writing in general, he/she (they?), writes: someone, or a person, or one as the subject of the phrase. For avoiding the male/female problem, some people accept the use of their/them, for example:
    If a person enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.

    josama said:
    1. Is the same if you don't use 'person', but, for example 'someone' or 'one'?:

    If someone enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.

    If one enters the room, he/she (they?) has to take his/her (their) shoes off.
    Yes, using someone, one and a person as an impersonal is fine. Using you is also acceptable.

    If you enter the room, you have to take your shoes off.
     

    josama

    Senior Member
    Colombia, Spanish
    VenusEnvy said:
    Yes, using someone, one and a person as an impersonal is fine. Using you is also acceptable.

    If you enter the room, you have to take your shoes off.
    Thank you very much. So, everything I wrote in green was perfect, huh? (in an informal way for some, though)

    Venus, I'm sorry: I SWEAR I SEARCHED IN ADVANCE of (of?) posting my question... I guess I have to sharpen my search skills :eek:
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Josama,

    It is very common for English speakers to use "they" as an impersonal pronoun. I say it all the time. I would say that it is the most common form in conversation.

    "Whenever anyone comes into my house, they always take off their shoes."
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    josama said:
    Venus, I'm sorry: I SWEAR I SEARCHED IN ADVANCE of (of?) posting my question... I guess I have to sharpen my search skills :eek:
    No, no, josama. It's ok! I knew about it because I had participated in the thread. No worries! :p
     
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