genre (argotique)

julage

New Member
English U.S.
Hi everyone. My French boyfriend was recently teasing me about supposedly spending a lot of time in front of the mirror getting ready. And, I said that I didn't spent too much time - that I actually was this cute. ;-) LOL And, he said to me "genre". I asked what he meant and he just said "genre quoi". He won't tell me what he meant, and I have to know so I can tease him back! lol Is this some kind of slang saying? I hope someone can help me!

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MODERATOR NOTE: This thread includes several existing discussions on the same topic.
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  • Iznogoud

    Senior Member
    French - Canada
    "Genre" can be used exactly like the word "like" in English when used as a non-word: "He was, like, big, like, you know." = "Il était, genre, grand..." (could be unique to Canada).
     

    frodon

    Member
    France
    "Genre!" is a very informal word.

    You would reply "genre" to someone who is (in a nice way) making fun of you or someone you won't believe
    • e.g: - "J'ai trouvé un billet de 50 eur dans la rue. "
    and the other personn would say - " Genre!" a synomym would be " c'est ca!..."

    (very bad example ...I know)
     
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    julage

    New Member
    English U.S.
    That makes sense frodon... he would have been saying to me "sure you don't stay in front of the mirror..." like he didn't believe me... and to make fun of me. that makes sense. Thanks!
     

    frodon

    Member
    France
    your welcome!

    don't use "Genre!" too often!

    it's not a nice word in French. Only "young " people would use it between themselves .

    it is a very familiar expression;)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    "distille" complétement d'accord avec toi :)

    En gros c'est :
    genre = tu te la raconte.
    I can confirm that in Québec, teenagers use "genre" to mean "comme" (like)... and they use it a lot.
    I'm curious about "tu te la racontes"; is it a more "up to date" way of saying "À d'autres" ?;)
     

    metronum

    Member
    French
    ex :
    _J'étais avec une meuf de dingue hier.
    _Genre ! Tu te la raconte enfaite.

    Its a way to say you are lying about sm.
    You also can use it to say "like me" (genre moi)

    But as "julage" asked it seem to mean more like I said.
    "She said she didn't spend time front of the mirror"
    But obviously she did then he replied
    -"genre" tu passes pas pas ton temps devant le miroir"
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    You would reply "genre" to someone who is (in a nice way) making fun of you or someone you won't believe
    • e.g: - "J'ai trouvé un billet de 50 eur dans la rue. "
    and the other personn would say - " Genre!" a synomym would be " c'est ca!..."
    This description sounds like "genre" is used in the same way that "as if!" is used by (some) teenagers in California.

    An older, more common phrase would "I'm sure!" (meaning I'm sure that's *not* true.)
     
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    geve

    Senior Member
    France, French
    Genre, when used as a one-word sentence, means "As if."
    This description sounds like "genre" is used in the same way that "as if!" is used by (some) teenagers in California.
    That's what I thought when I read the original post: "As if!", and maybe "Yeah, right", what do you think?

    The good thing with "Genre!" is that you can lenghten the nasalized "en" and insist on the R - the sound of it conveys sarcasm too...
     

    equilingual

    Senior Member
    "Genre" can be used exactly like the word "like" in English when used as a non-word: "He was, like, big, like, you know." = "Il était, genre, grand..." (could be unique to Canada).
    I beg to differ, CarolineR.
    Tout à fait d'accord avec Iznogoud:thumbsup:. « Genre » se traduit exactement par « Like » en langage jeune (or teen slang). S'utilise beaucoup en France, notamment.
     

    fweym

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Not sure if people will still look at this thread but I can confirm that people my age (teenagers) at the lycée francais de londres use genre like Iznogoud says, like "like" in English
    par exemple
    "Y avait du monde?"
    "Ouai genre 300 personnes!"

    mais je reconnais que c'est tres familier et peut-etre que ca ne se dit pas en France, ché pas koi :D
     

    enJoanet

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hi!
    I'd like to have your opinion regarding how genre ought to be translated in the sentences below...In all these cases, "genre" isn't used as a synonym for "sex" nor does it refer to the artistic genres...

    -"Il s'est précipité sur les verres et en a cassé deux! Genre, il aurait pu faire attention..."
    -"Genre dépêche-toi un peu: on est déjà en retard!"
    -"Genre t'en penses quoi?"


    This very idiomatic use of genre confuses me quite a lot...I could really use some help...!
    :)
     

    dewsy

    Senior Member
    England, english
    Hi there

    I have noticed my 10 year old daughter using this ALL the time and it drives me mad. I think the closest you can get to it in English would be

    "Yeah, like...." or even just "Like...."
     

    enJoanet

    Senior Member
    Français
    Yep...
    Young people :cool: use it quite a lot...and it drives me crazy too that I can't find any proper translation...Interessingly enough, it would be really easy for me to translate it into Spanish, where people use a totally different word all the while expressing the exact same idea!!!
    maddening, isn'it!!
    :)
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Yes, it's (very annoyingly) Like,... :eek:

    Americans under 30 have adopted this word sometimes to the point of the ridiculous! It appears at the beginning as well as stuck into possibly every other word in conversation.

    So, like yesterday I was like waiting for the bus when she like came up to me and was like, "are you gonna like come with us to the party?"... etc...

    Personally I would not suggest emulating this if you want to have any appearance of intelligence...
     

    Chrysalila

    New Member
    France
    Hi,
    c'est une expression chez les jeunes mais ça ne veut rien dire de spécial, c'est juste un mot "parasite". Je ne crois pas qu'il y ait d'équivalent anglais. Vos pouvez traduire les phrases comme si ce mot n'était pas là, dans ce type de phrase.
     

    Jad

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    This description sounds like "genre" is used in the same way that "as if!" is used by (some) teenagers in California.
    It's also used in the UK, except to me it almost sounds a bit dated (I'm 18!) like 1990's, but I could be wrong. There was a successful British teen series called As If that ran from 2001 - 2004, so we're well aware of what it means. On the other hand, an American version was made in 2002 but it was so unsuccessful that only 2 episodes went out. Anyway :D

    Maybe other possible translations of "genre" in this context (or what I'd use anyway) are.... "whatever!" or "I bet!"
     
    I would definitely translate it as 'yeah right!'. I've heard people say it in France (not in a serious way though, just to imitate some teenage trends in a funny way). I think it just means 'I'm sure what you're saying is not true' and adds sarcasm.
     

    midlifecrisis

    Member
    UK, English
    I'm finding 'social media French' a challenge - lots of elliptical phrases that defy word by word translation! I've seen 'non mais genre' (as a standalone phrase) a few times; at least once it seemed to be in the context of a jokey denial, perhaps like 'as if' ?
     

    MarieChp

    New Member
    french
    Basically we say it before explaining something but the meaning of this expression isn't really clear.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    So, is there a good idiomatic English translation for "genre" (used when the other person doesn't believe you or finds it hard to believe something)?

    For example, "Tu sais quoi, je rencontre Bill Gates ce soir." -"Genre !"

    I don't think "Whatever!" really translates this kind of "Genre !".

    Thanks in advance!
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Often in BE one would use what may well be an americanism: "Sure thing".

    More formally (and old fashioned) there is: "Of course, my Dear" (with an unconvinced tone of voice).
     

    mag.g

    New Member
    french-france
    In THIS context : You wish ! (exactly the "yeah, right" spirit which is not conveyed by "sure thing")
     

    mag.g

    New Member
    french-france
    You have to chose between enhancing the notion of confrontation or irony according to the context/speaker.
    genre/du style/zarma challenge the other, make fun of him openly. Which is more the mediterranean way to bicker and banter. We rarely go with sweet derision (but that would be the BE humour, indeed) when we use this kind of language in everyday life. Some people, however will use it to make fun of the young suburban language at the same time that they make fun of the other (like using Yo! in english).
     
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