genus, <nim.> auctoritas, & ratio:

< Previous | Next >

Belastro

Member
English - U.S.
“Duplex est argumenti genus, nim. auctoritas, & ratio:” ―Chauvin s.v. argumentum, Lexicon philosophicum (1713).

Chambers rendered the statement as "Arguments are divided, with regard to their source, into those fetched from reason, and those from authority." Can you suggest how Chauvin perhaps intended "nim." to be understood? Thanks beforehand...
 
  • Scholiast

    Senior Member
    saluete collaboratores!

    I have not seen this abbreviation before, but from the context (Chauvin, p. 57) I surmise that it stands for nimirum, = 'evidently', 'without doubt', 'presumably', 'of course' (these glosses from OLD).

    Σ
     
    Last edited:

    Scholiast

    Senior Member
    @Winiarczyk

    gratias maximas. exempla ista enim demonstrant coniecturam meam (# 3) non omnino falsam fuisse, sed me Latinitatem recentioris aevi non satis scire. ut scribebam, modum illum dicendi Germanicum mihi in mentem venerat, 'und zwar', qui cum e cioè aequi valet.🙂

    Σ
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top