German don't rely on driving skill, but engineering.

kenny4528

Senior Member
Mandarin, Taiwan
Hi,

I just saw a car commercial on TV where a slogan was likely said:

1. Germans don't rely on driving skills, but engineering.

I can't be sure whether the on is used before engineering:

2. Germans don't rely on driving skills, but on engineering.

Which one is correct, or both are ok?

Thanks.
 
  • Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Sorry for having been so obscure, dear Kenny.

    I meant (although I can't say I'm certain of it) that both are perfectly acceptable, and the first is somewhat preferable, because it avoids the repetition and has a nice ring to it - that's good for advertising.

     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    Sorry for having been so obscure, dear Kenny.

    I meant (although I can't say I'm certain of it) that both are perfectly acceptable, and the first is somewhat preferable, because it avoids the repetition and has a nice ring to it - that's good for advertising.

    I think that's Germans, by the way
    Thanks for your good explanation, Trisia. Yes, it read much better without on in it.

    Oop, thanks again for telling that I have a typo, a big mistake.
     

    Klystron29

    Senior Member
    Guernsey, GB English
    "Germans don't rely on driving skills, rather on engineering".

    It sounds better when the words are spoken as then you can hear the emphasis.
    Also, I agree with panjandrum, it feels....................unfinished.
    Regards.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    Without on, I keep waiting for something to follow engineering; the sentence feels
    Is this dear panj's idea of special effects? :D

    I find both equally acceptable, but that's just me.

    --He didn't fall for her beauty, but her intelligence.
    --He didn't fall for her beauty, but for her intelligence.

    Yes, I don't prefer one to the other.
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    I think they both sound a little odd because normally such a sentence would begin with the positive: 'He fell for her intelligence, not her beauty', 'Germans rely on engineering, not driving skills.'
    The fact that starting with the negative sounds a little odd would make me (if I wanted to do it that way round) incline to repeating the preposition to make it clearer.
     

    Klystron29

    Senior Member
    Guernsey, GB English
    Suehil,
    I agree with your comments, in essence. However, in kenny4528's original post he did say it was from a TV commercial where there is much grammatical licence. Putting the negative first "saves the best 'til last", hence giving the emphasis where they want it.
     

    tinlizzy

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Also, the words were probably accompanied by scenes of a 'steroetypical' bad driver (say a women) with the kids in the backseat, skidding in the rain then suddenly regaining control because of the anti-lock brakes, etc....
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Germans don't rely on driving skills, rather on engineering".

    It sounds better when the words are spoken as then you can hear the emphasis.
    Also, I agree with panjandrum, it feels....................unfinished.
    Regards.
    I was going to say that!

    I think adding "rather on" or more colloquially, "but rather on", makes the sentence sound complete. Without it, the sentence sounds more like a newspaper headline:

    Germans Rely on Engineering,
    Not Driving Skills

    Dresden, Germany. The results of a recent study on the driving habits of Germans showed conclusively that German drivers rely more on technology than their driving skills. Anti-lock brakes...
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top