Germany/German [football/soccer shirt/jersey/t-shirt]

Lachelle

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi,

He was wearing a T-shirt from Germany soccer team.
He was wearing a T-shirt from German soccer team.

Which one is better?
 
  • watercanyon

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    Both need articles:

    He was wearing a T-shirt from the Germany soccer team. (This implies this is the team that represents the entire country.)

    He was wearing a T-shirt from a German soccer team. (This implies there are two or more German teams he could have selected from.)
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Neither sound right to me.
    I would say 'He was wearing the German soccer team's T-shirt.'
    Or, if it's clear that you are talking about soccer:
    'He was wearing the German national team's T-shirt'.
     

    Kumpel

    Senior Member
    British English
    He was wearing the German football shirt. - Germany's national team
    He was wearing a German football shirt. - any other German team

    I must add: as you can see, there are lots of ways of saying all of the different parts of this - football/footy/soccer, (T-)shirt, w/ - w/o 'team'... etc.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    In England, the football shirt of the national team is called an "England shirt". England is, of course a noun, but it is used attributively. We would consider any other option to be too long-winded. I don't believe that in Britain we would have any objection to the German equivalent being called a "Germany shirt".

    In your examples, you must use an article, of course. I would choose "the" because it is the representative shirt of the German team:
    He was wearing the shirt of the German football team. (Unless you are speaking in the context of those few countries where football is called soccer, in which case, I presume, "soccer shirt".)
     
    Last edited:

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Is he wearing a jersey or a t-shirt? Jersey is like one of the shirts the players would wear, t-shirt is just, well, a t-shirt. Anyway I would say "He's wearing a German soccer team jersey/t-shirt." or "He's wearing a German soccer jersey" or "He's wearing a German national [soccer] team jersey ("a" here goes with the jersey, not the team)."
     

    relic5.2

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    Ah I'm from Kilkenny, Gaelic doesn't exist here.

    But I've only ever noticed people say soccer when stressing it's not Gaelic or when translating sacair.
     

    Kumpel

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't believe that in Britain we would have any objection to the German equivalent being called a "Germany shirt".
    If, by we in Britain, you include me, then I'd have to disagree. I have an objection to it, well, not an objection as such, I just wouldn't choose to say it; I'd find a longer phrase. It's odd, though, that I think Germany kit would sound fine when talking about the whole kit.
    This is just my opinion, and I would still perfectly understand Germany shirt.

    Lloyd
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with MatchingMole. "He was wearing a Germany shirt" would do fine.

    I'm not sure about football jersey - this makes me think of a jumper.

    I also have a massive aversion to the "s" word above!
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    I agree with MatchingMole. "He was wearing a Germany shirt" would do fine.

    I'm not sure about football jersey - this makes me think of a jumper.

    I also have a massive aversion to the "s" word above!
    Might be an AE/IE difference as opposed to BE.

    A soccer/football jersey is the proper term for such an item of clothing here (presuming that we're not talking about t-shirts). A soccer/football shirt is acceptable too but less current in my experience.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think in AmE to say that someone was "wearing a Germany shirt" wouldn't convey much information, because it woudn't be obvious that "Germany" referred to a team.
     

    watercanyon

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    We just don't get the soccer-football reference here in the US like the rest of the world does. But say "He was wearing a Cowboys shirt." in the rest of the world, and they would wonder if he was wearing boots and a hat, too!
     

    Mr.Learner

    Member
    India-English & Hindi
    Is he wearing a jersey or a t-shirt? Jersey is like one of the shirts the players would wear, t-shirt is just, well, a t-shirt. Anyway I would say "He's wearing a German soccer team jersey/t-shirt." or "He's wearing a German soccer jersey" or "He's wearing a German national [soccer] team jersey ("a" here goes with the jersey, not the team)."
    He's wearing a German soccer jersey" is correct.
     
    He's wearing a German soccer jersey" is correct.
    Not in BE, Mr Learner.

    Jersey has not been used in the UK for decades, and then it was mainly only applied to the thicker garment worn by goalkeepers, who needed to be kept warm in the colder months.

    It doesn't do to make dogmatic statements like yours on this board. I've been chastised for that myself more than once, and probably will be again. . . maybe as early as a few minutes from now.

    Rover
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not in BE, Mr Learner.

    Jersey has not been used in the UK for decades, and then it was mainly only applied to the thicker garment worn by goalkeepers, who needed to be kept warm in the colder months.

    It doesn't do to make dogmatic statements like yours on this board. I've been chastised for that myself more than once, and probably will be again. . . maybe as early as a few minutes from now.

    Rover
    As a quick read through the other posts would have shown you Mr. Learner.
     

    elistina

    New Member
    English
    I think in AmE to say that someone was "wearing a Germany shirt" wouldn't convey much information, because it woudn't be obvious that "Germany" referred to a team.
     
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