Germany was formally announced

jester.

Senior Member
Germany -> German
My last question concerning my history test:

I used the verb "announce" in two sentences. Here they are:

"After the first free elections Konrad Adenauer became Chancellor of Germany and the Federal Republic of Germany was formally announced."

"The creation of the German Democratic Republic in the Soviet zone was formally announced in October 1949."

In both sentences my teacher marked the two words "formally announced" as mistakes of expression.

Astoundingly, there is a timeline in the book my teacher uses to teach us, from which I quote the following sentence: "October: The GDR (German Democratic Republic) formally announced. Germany now divided."

Any comments?
 
  • Vinlander

    Senior Member
    Canada, American English (mostly)
    If you have your facts are right here (i.e., these things were actually formally announced and when you said that they were), then I don't see any problems. Having said that, it might be better were you to not use the passive voice, i.e., state who actually announced it (and thereby think about the question of it being formal, what does that really mean in international affairs?).

    Vinlander
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The first rule of studying English is to do whatever your teacher wants in order to receive a good grade, regardless of whether he or she is correct.

    It always helps in questions like this if you mention whether the teacher is a native English speaker and if so, whether it's BE or AE.

    Edit: Upon reflection, it occurred to me that I have suffered many idiots in the course of my education, regardless of subject.
     

    Vinlander

    Senior Member
    Canada, American English (mostly)
    The first rule of studying English is to do whatever your teacher wants in order to receive a good grade, regardless of whether he or she is correct.

    It always helps in questions like this if you mention whether the teacher is a native English speaker and if so, whether it's BE or AE.

    Edit: Upon reflection, it occurred to me that I have suffered many idiots in the course of my education, regardless of subject.
    This is very good advice. Ask your prof why your statements are wrong. If they explain why then go with that. If they say, "Because I say so." Then you know; just suffer them until you move on (revenge can wait).

    Vinlander
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    One might take issue with your saying that the FDR was announced rather than its creation being announced, but that would be extremely nit-picky. I don't see any error in the second sentence at all.

    I would like to know the justification for this marking down. I don't think there is a problem with passivity in texts like this, I would expect to see it.
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    Well, I guess that "formally" is supposed to mean "officially".

    Having said that, it might be better were you to not use the passive voice, i.e., state who actually announced it (and thereby think about the question of it being formal, what does that really mean in international affairs?).
    I resorted to the passive voice because I did not know who announced the creation of those two countries. ;)


    Additionally I'd like to say that ypur advice is very friendly. But this can't be right. There must be a way to decide whether or not my sentence is right. This is about my marks and, as those marks have a direct impact on the marks of my final school report, my future, after all.

    Addition:

    It always helps in questions like this if you mention whether the teacher is a native English speaker and if so, whether it's BE or AE.
    In German public schools, there are hardly any native English teachers. But this woman who corrected my history test is rather a BE teacher.
     

    Vinlander

    Senior Member
    Canada, American English (mostly)
    All that I can suggest is that you ask her. It may be a question of substance, not of grammar. If it is of grammar, then it has been mistakenly marked as incorrect. But it may be a question of substance, either because the formal announcement did not take place in the manner you described it or because it does not make sense to talk about formal announcements in this context.

    For example, if I were to formally announce that "I was an empereror just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me...," it would be wrong to call my announcement a "formal announcement." "Formal announcement" here does not describe the manner in which it was announced (with much pomp and circumstance), it describes the fact of some sort of legally recognized form. "Legally recognized form" in this context may be an oxymoron (as some would argue "international law" is).

    Vinlander
     

    jester.

    Senior Member
    Germany -> German
    No, she just underlined the words and wrote "A" on the margin. "A" is a German abbreviation which stands for a wrong expression.
    But I'm going to ask her tomorrow.
     
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