Germany's or German's

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi.

I wrote the following short paragraph:

Ann (my student) tells me the country that interests her most is Germany. She says that when she was younger she studied German for around two years, and she grew to really appreciate the country's culture and history. But what attracts her most is Germany's rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.

I think "Germany's" means "the country's" while "German's" means its people. I wonder if I need to use "German's" here. I'm not sure.

Thank you so much!
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    It's wrong (you clearly mean the people, not the country) but so would be German's. You'd need Germans' there.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hmm, yes, I wasn't sure yet because I know a country could also have its attitude, am I right?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Yes. All the following are possible.
    But what attracts her most is Germany's rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.
    But what attracts her most is the Germans' rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.
    But what attracts her most is the German rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    It sounds weird to me. It would have to be the German, rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything, but even then, it sounds lumpen. The adjectives are additive yet rigorous and meticulous seem to form one unit whose tenor is quite separate from German. For me, it is a question of order of adjectives.

    Giving it more thought, I think
    But what attracts her most is the rigorous and meticulous, German, attitude toward everything.
    could work - I have no great feelings about the second comma.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But what attracts her most is the German rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.

    What's wrong with that?
    The word order is unidiomatic, which is why it sounds strange. You’d have to rephrase it. For example:


    But what attracts her most is the German mentality, characterised by a rigorous and meticulous attitude toward everything.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I agree with this one.

    But what attracts her most is the German rigorous and meticulous German attitude toward everything.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    :thumbsup:

    But I would still prefer “But what attracts her most is the rigorous and meticulous attitude the Germans have to everything”.
     
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