get all warm and fuzzy

assmat

Senior Member
FRENCH
Bonsoir tout le monde,

J'ai du mal à traduire une partie de ma phrase, car il y a une expression que je ne connais pas :

"we get all warm and fuzzy", je vous met la phrase complète pour que vous puissiez en comprendre le sens :

If you'll excuse me, while we get all warm and fuzzy about your, you know, good old days at Manhattan, but i've seen where those glory days ended up.

Si quelqu'un pouvez me dire de quoi il s'agit car là, je cale !!! D'avance un grand merci à tous et ce forum est vraiment très agréable.
 
  • mollisha

    Senior Member
    French - France
    pendant qu'on s'attendrit sur vos souvenirs...
    to feel warm and fuzzy --> se sentir tout chose, tout chaleureux...

    Meanwhile I am struggling with:
    "while it's all warm and fuzzy, let me ask you..."
    Contexte: it's actually not so warm and fuzzy, being ironic. She is discussing her grandfather's death with an insurance man, so it's a bit more cold than that. (She does feel very emotional though)


    My attempts:
    "Pendant que c'est tout chaud et frais, je peux vous poser la question..."
    "Tant qu'on est dans le vif du sujet..." - too far off, no?
    "Tant que c'est tout moelleux..."
    "Pendant qu'on s'attendrit..."

    Any bright ideas?
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    Except, possibly, for the last one, I don't find those suggestions suit.

    What came just before?

    'Je profite de ce que nous soyons dans cette douce intimité pour vous demander' ?
     
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    guillaumedemanzac

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England Home Counties
    "we get all warm and fuzzy",
    If you'll excuse me, while we get all warm and fuzzy about your, you know, good old days at Manhattan, but I've seen where those glory days ended up.

    The word while has no sequence; it should be before. And the but is a non-sequitur.

    Warm and fuzzy means sentimental - very sarcastic usually, especially in this case with the emphasiser "all". "Please forgive me for interrupting, but, before we get all sentimental about your good old days in Manhattan, let me tell you that I have seen where those 'glory days' ended up."

    (People speaking are often unclear as they think while speaking and often end up with illogical statements where the beginning doesn't match the ending)
     

    Soleil_Couchant

    Senior Member
    English
    guillaume I think it's the commas that are confusing things.

    "If you'll excuse me while we get all warm and fuzzy about your, you know, good ol' days in Manhattan...but I've seen where the glory days ended up."

    I agree it's "in," not "at." But the "while" makes sense to me, even if the sentence is a tad awkward. So to me, they're saying more:

    "Sorry, if you'll excuse me... I know we're getting all warm and fuzzy right now about your good ol' days in Manhattan...but I've seen where those glory days ended up..."

    EDIT: To the recent post by mollisha, can you give me the complete sentence (or what came before, like Itisi said)? I'm not convinced totally of the sarcasm from what you've said yet (no offense) and think it'd help to read it myself... With that said, in my opinion, the concept of "warm and fuzzy" doesn't really change depending on the context. Even if they were being sarcastic...still translate it in the same way as you would if they weren't...
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    It seems to me that assmat, who opened this thread back in 2006, has modified the original and changed Genomex to Manhattan. So "at" is right, after all.
    I found two transcriptions, and the second one (which doesn't start with "If") sounds more accurate/legible to my non native ears:
    - If you'll excuse me, while we get all warm and fuzzy about your, you know, good old days at genomex, but i've seen where those glory days ended up. Source 1
    - You'll excuse me when I don't get all warm and fuzzy about your, you know, good old days at Genomex, but I've seen where those glory days ended up. Source 2
    "Pendant qu'on s'attendrit..."
    Sans plus de contexte, je pense comme Itisi que c'est la seule solution qui pourrait éventuellement convenir.

    Mais encore là, ce n'est pas certain. "while" pourrait aussi signifier « bien que ».
    Ou si c'est bien ironique, quelque chose comme : Tout ça, c'est bien attendrissant, mais permettez-moi de vous poser une question.
    Alors oui, il faudrait un contexte plus large. Comme ce qui précède et ce qu'il lui demande. :)
     
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    mollisha

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Tout ça, c'est bien attendrissant, mais permettez-moi de vous poser une question.

    That is a good suggestion.

    Here is a fuller context:
    So let's say he does decide there's something he wants to bestow, while it's all warm and fuzzy, I have to ask the question. Is anything worth anything?

    (I am always a bit hesitant to give too much context because of those non-disclosure agreements)
     

    Soleil_Couchant

    Senior Member
    English
    Hmm. As I mentioned, whether sarcastic or not, the meaning of warm and fuzzy itself wouldn't change, so keep that in mind. I think it's possible the speaker is being serious. As in, "While everyone is still being kind to one another, I have to ask the question..." Maybe. Because if it's talking about inheritance after someone dies, that can often get very ugly... so, again, it seems maybe the speaker is saying something like ..."while everything is still nice and friendly, let me ask..."

    And sorry, I'm not usually one to demand tons of context! I just wasn't quite sure about this one. :)
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    Avec cet ajout de contexte, ma suggestion ne convient plus à mon avis (à moins de complètement remanier le texte et d'adapter).
    Là, je comprends la même chose que S-C:
    "While everyone is still being kind to one another, I have to ask the question.
    À moins que tu aies changé les temps de verbe, je comprends aussi maintenant que le grand-père est peut-être à l'agonie mais toujours vivant.
    Mais je ne suis pas inspirée. Il me vient seulement : pendant que personne n'est à couteaux tirés, mais ce qu'il faut c'est le contraire. :oops:

    Cela dit, j'ai encore l'impression qu'il manque des éléments pour trancher.
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ...Warm and fuzzy means sentimental - very sarcastic usually...
    No it doesn't. It's a perfectly proper technical term in transactional analysis, as I think I explained in #7.

    It may well be used sarcastically here. There are many people who cannot accept the principles of TA, and especially when they're couched in lay terms. They'd be far happier with "positive emotional feedback" or some such.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    ...and?

    Many people who talk about "bra-burning feminists" haven't read Betty Friedan; many who use the term "bunny-hugger" haven't heard of the Earth First movement. All this only goes to show how pervasive a good idea can be, and how reactionaries often resort to sarcasm.
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    I don't agree with guillaume that that expression is used usually in a very sarcastic way. It can be used ironically, as in this context, if I understand the situation, but that doesn't have to be reactionary!

    Surely, TA hasn't a monopoly on those words...
     

    Soleil_Couchant

    Senior Member
    English
    Okay, but the "warm fuzzies" represented kindness, goodness, warmth, happiness, right? And it was a book aimed for children, not psychotherapists. I'm pretty sure most people aren't thinking about transactional analysis when they use the phrase "warm fuzzies." As already mentioned multiple times, they refer to those good feelings you get when someone says/does something nice. And a "warm and fuzzy" person or thing is something that gives those feelings. Why do these threads always devolve so rapidly on tangents that go away from helping the author translate something (based on how the author was using the phrase). We're supposed to be helping mollisha.

    (and I also agree that "warm and fuzzy" is NOT always used sarcastically.)
     

    Itisi

    Senior Member
    English UK/French
    o_O I don't understand exactly what your objection is and to whom it is addressed...

    As far as I'm concerned, I'm interested in the context of this thread...
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Langue française ♀
    What often creates issues - and can get confusing - is when an old thread is reanimated, with a different context, and people reply to the initial one.
    I don't agree either that it usually is, but I think Guillaume (who quoted it in #8) is right saying the expression was used sarcastically in that context.

    Not to mention that it was weirdly written, likely because the transcript wasn't right, as I found out later (post 10).
    When something is misquoted, or not clear, often people start rewriting to make sense out of an awkward sentence.;)
     
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