get atrophied from disuse

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chong lee

Senior Member
türkçe
Hi,
The quote is from the story "Clovis on Parental Responsibilities" by H. H. Munro.

Before Mrs. Eggelby told proudly her children never plays card games.

Could you explain the phrase "their powers of enlightened enjoyment get atrophied from disuse"? Do "their" refer to two kinds of tale?

Thank you.


"What kind of knowledge?" demanded Mrs. Eggelby, with the air a jury might collectively wear when finding a verdict without leaving the box.

"Well, among other things, she's introduced me to at least four different ways of cooking lobster," said Clovis gratefully. "That, of course, wouldn't appeal to you; people who abstain from the pleasures of the card-table never really appreciate the finer possibilities of the dining-table. I suppose their powers of enlightened enjoyment get atrophied from disuse."
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    Their refers to "people who abstain from the pleasures of the card-table".

    People who don't play cards don't know how to enjoy themselves.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I hear "atrophied" mainly applied to muscles, but other body tissue might be applicable. Muscles lose both the size and strength from lack of use and are said to "atrophy". So too would the "powers of enlightened enjoyment".

    Google defines "atrophy" as:

    gradually decline in effectiveness or vigor due to underuse or neglect.
     
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