get breast implants

Thomas1

Senior Member
polszczyzna warszawska
I'd like to say that a women got breast implants but I want to use a more "sophisticated" word instead of get, can I say:
a female customs officer who inserted breast implants

Oh and one more question can I insert herslef between the verb and the object here:
a female customs officer who inserted herself breast implants
a female customs officer who got herself breast implants


Or it would mean that she carried out the operation on herself?

Thanks in advance,
Thomas
 
  • TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    The only other plausible way I can think to address this is "to undergo (have) breast augmentation surgery." But "to get breast implants" is what you'd hear most often. "Insert" doesn't work here -- the surgeon does the inserting, not the recipient.

    Elizabeth
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you, Elizabeth :)

    One more question; can I say a female customs officer who had breast implants inserted?
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    If you want to be very formal you can say:

    ...female customs officer who had breast augmentation surgery.

    This tends to be the going jargon.
    Oh and one more question can I insert herslef between the verb and the object here:
    a female customs officer who inserted herself breast implants
    a female customs officer who got herself breast implants
    English tends not to use the reflexive in this manner. You would just say:

    she got implants or she had breast augmentation surgery or if you really want to be snarky, "she had a boob job."

    Saying "she inserted herself" or "got herself" does sound like she performed the surgery herself.

    There is one exception to that. In casual conversation, when someone wants to express a bit of sarcasm, they might say something along the lines of this:

    Well, I see that Susan's gone and got herself a boob job...
    Well, I see that Susan's gone and got herself some breast implants...

    She must be making her husband awfully happy.

    It's a bit cheeky, and is intended to sound rather snotty, so is not part of formal speech or writing.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you, I think I'll pick something from propositions by Elizabeth or Gen, they are formal in style and fit my context.


    GenJen54 said:
    I would not use the word "inserted" at all in this context. As Elizabeth mentioned, in this case, only the doctor does the "inserting."
    Wouldn't that imply that the doctor did it, it's similar in construction to this sentence:
    I had my car repaired last week.
    Which means that I hired/ordered someone to repair my car but I didn't do it myslef (at least this is how they thought me to use this construction at school) or the sentence with implants is a different type?
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Technically, from a linguistic standpoint, one could be grammatically correct in saying (using your car sentence as an example): I had my implants inserted last week.

    From a "native" standpoint, however, it's simply not used that way.

    With any medical (or beauty) procedure, however, there is an underlying presumtion that the doctor (or beautician) did the work.

    She got a face lift
    She got botox injections.
    She had her appendix removed.
    I had my hair cut.
    I got my nails done.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    GenJen54 said:
    She had her appendix removed.
    I had my hair cut.
    I got my nails done.
    So what would be the difference between the above examples and mine: a female customs officer who had breast implants inserted, please?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    imithe
    If "herself" is to be used in the sentence in any way, I'd like to think you'd omit the "female". In fact I think that the "breast augmentation" or "breast implants" would suffice to allow you to omit both those.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Use of the word "inserted." It's simply not used in that way. Instead, we talk about the procedure itself.

    Most Formal: She had breast augmentation surgery.
    Colloquial: She got breast implants.
    Slang: She had/got her boobs done. (She got a boob job).

    I can't tell you why we do not use "insert" here, we just don't. It's not "natural" English.
     
    Thomas1 said:
    I'd like to say that a women got breast implants but I want to use a more "sophisticated" word instead of get, can I say:
    a female customs officer who inserted breast implants

    Oh and one more question can I insert herslef between the verb and the object here:
    a female customs officer who inserted herself breast implants
    a female customs officer who got herself breast implants


    Or it would mean that she carried out the operation on herself?

    Thanks in advance,
    Thomas

    "The customs officer had breast implants inserted by a cosmetic surgeon."



    LRV
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GenJen54
    She had her appendix removed.
    I had my hair cut.
    I got my nails done.

    From simonaj:
    So what would be the difference between the above examples and mine: a female customs officer who had breast implants inserted, please?rf
    fdre43

    "inserted" is just uncomfortable altogether. It's a little too personal--to graphic as to how the procedure is done.

    It's like there's a difference between me saying that I had a rectal exam at the doctor's office, and "The doctor inserted his finger up my rectum." Everyone on the planet that knows what breast augmentation is knows that they must be inserted. For that reason, alone, inserted can be un-inserted (omitted) in the sentence. The fact that the verb gives people the heebie-jeebies figuring out how they move stuff out of the way to insert them makes the sentence even more uncomfortable.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    mjscott said:
    It's like there's a difference between me saying that I had a rectal exam at the doctor's office, and "The doctor inserted his finger up my rectum." Everyone on the planet that knows what breast augmentation is knows that they must be inserted. For that reason, alone, inserted can be un-inserted (omitted) in the sentence. The fact that the verb gives people the heebie-jeebies figuring out how they move stuff out of the way to insert them makes the sentence even more uncomfortable.
    BRAVO and well-put. I couldn't have said it better.
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    I want to go back to the point made by Maxiogee, i.e. that the matter referred to makes it - potentially - redundant to specify the gender of the person benefiting from the mammary enhancement procedure. I disagree. In this day and age, it could be man having it done (perhaps as a preliminary step to a sex-change operation, i.e. pre-op.). As a result, the gender of the female customs officer should definitely be indicated. I am sure you will all agree on this one. (It could even be a man who does not want a gender change but merely likes the idea of having a big bosom -not that I have ever met any...)
     
    James Brandon said:
    I want to go back to the point made by Maxiogee, i.e. that the matter referred to makes it - potentially - redundant to specify the gender of the person benefiting from the mammary enhancement procedure. I disagree. In this day and age, it could be man having it done (perhaps as a preliminary step to a sex-change operation, i.e. pre-op.). As a result, the gender of the female customs officer should definitely be indicated. I am sure you will all agree on this one. (It could even be a man who does not want a gender change but merely likes the idea of having a big bosom -not that I have ever met any...)

    I can't imagine any red-blooded heterosexual man wanting his very own (albeit silicone) breasts. He would be a laughing stock among his "mates down the pub". No, he would have to be a very reclusive person and enjoy his "treasures" in the privacy of his own home. :eek:

    From sociological research which I've carried out on the web I gather that "she-males" have had successful implants, but have been reluctant to part with their male "bits". I find this all rather confusing - but each to their own I suppose.



    LRV
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    How about "She obtained breast implants"? :idea:

    For the word 'insert' - from thefreedictionary.com:
    You insert a key into a lock; you insert an illustration into a text
    Same source for 'implant':
    a prosthesis placed permanently in tissue (heart, joint, dental, shunt, lens,etc.)
    Maxiogee! No one is born 'deficient', the only deficiency is the cosmetic surgeon's bank account!:p
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    It sounds a bit like she got them in a packet of corn-flakes... I can't see why "insert" would be wrong per se, even though it may sound painful. As for deficiencies, it is all relative, indeed.
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    The word 'insert' just sounds so mechanical to me, not at all like an invasive surgical procedure; m-w.com gives the following definitions:
    put or thrust in <insert a spacecraft into orbit>; set in & make fast, especially: to insert by sewing between 2 cut edges
    I am thinking of the phrase, "insert coin to operate" (i.e. an arcade game, a mechanical children's ride, etc.).
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    As GenJen wrote several posts ago, you simply don't hear "insert" in conjunction with "breast implants." It may not be wrong grammatically, but I think we've been discussing usage, and it's not used that way. Instead, one either gets (not obtains) breast implants, has her breasts done, or has breast augmentation surgery. I think that's pretty much the end of the story. :)

    Elizabeth
     

    Derringer

    Member
    USA
    USA, English, Portuguese, German, Latin
    I don't think it's wrong per se, but it does draw attention to the procedure rather than the result of the procedure. "She got breast implants," I think, implies referral to her post-operative situation. It would be the difference between "She got her teeth fixed" and "She had a dentist grind and repair her teeth."
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Those Google search results include many instances where obtain does not immediately precede breast implants. Searching on the phrase "obtain breast implants," I find only about 250 hits, compared to 80,000+ for the phrase "get breast implants."

    Cheers,
    Elizabeth
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    So what would be the difference between the above examples and mine: a female customs officer who had breast implants inserted, please?
    Something just occurred to me when re-reading this thread. It's the "duh" that has been here all along.

    We don't use "insert" with "implant," because when something is implanted, it is, by its very nature, inserted. To use "she had breast implants inserted" is redundant.

    Look at the category tree (No 3.) for implant using the WR Dictionaries.
    Now, look at the category tree (B, verb Nos. 1 and 4) for insert.

    The two words are synonymous in certain contexts.

    When you implant, you are putting one object into another.
    When you insert, you are putting one object into another.

    They mean the same thing.

    french4beth said:
    I am convinced that 'obtain breast implants' is a valid option (apparently I'm not the only one as I got over 1,540,000 hits on google using the above phrase - including nationalreviewofmedicine.com, ehow.net, breast-cancer-research.com and plasticsurgery.net
    Please review the names of the websites you included here. The vast majority are medical in nature. It's natural that the medical community would opt for "obtain," because it is more erudite sounding.

    That does not mean its use is "colloquial," however. How many times to you say obtain in a day? Not that often, I would assume.

    "get" is by far more common in everyday, spoken English. Only thomas is able to say whether "obtain" or "get" fits best into the context of his work.
     

    french4beth

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Yikes! :eek: I was simply trying to provide an alternative to 'get breast implants' as per the original thread - isn't that the whole idea of the forum?;)

    In My Humble Opinion, 'obtain breast implants' is a valid option - I'm not a medical expert, but I am a native English speaker, and I have heard this expression before.

    Thomas didn't specify if he wanted colloquial alternatives, so I am just trying to make a suggestion. :idea:
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    french4beth said:
    In My Humble Opinion, 'obtain breast implants' is a valid option - I'm not a medical expert, but I am a native English speaker, and I have heard this expression before.
    Somehow "obtain" makes me picture someone taking possession of silicon sacs rather than having the surgical implant procedure, but live and learn! :D

    Elizabeth
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thomas1 said:
    I'd like to say that a women got breast implants but I want to use a more "sophisticated" word instead of get, can I say:
    a female customs officer who inserted breast implants

    Oh and one more question can I insert herslef between the verb and the object here:
    a female customs officer who inserted herself breast implants
    a female customs officer who got herself breast implants
    Taking Thomas1 at his word, the most "sophisticated" way of saying this is probably, "a female customs officer who had had breast augmentation."
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    GenJen54 said:
    We don't use "insert" with "implant," because when something is implanted, it is, by its very nature, inserted. To use "she had breast implants inserted" is redundant.
    Um, Gen, AN implant is a noun. You gotta do something with it.

    Saying she implanted her implants... now THAT'S redundant.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    Joelline said:
    Taking Thomas1 at his word, the most "sophisticated" way of saying this is probably, "a female customs officer who had had breast augmentation."
    So saying "she got big ol' fake hooties" wouldn't be the most sophisticated phrasing?

    If you want a euphemism, I'm sure we can come up with a few. Mammalian enhancement for example.
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    "Insert" per se probably is not wrong but may not be used colloquially, indeed. The contributor who pointed out that "insert" and "implant" have very similar meanings, if not identical in the medical field, however, has a point. So, to say that "a woman had implants inserted" is most probably redundant.

    To use "obtain" may be correct but perhaps a bit clumsy or misleading - it sounds to me like she went out and bought them in a store... Even doctors can get their lingo wrong...

    As several contributors have said, "to have breast augmentation surgery" and phrases built around the verb "to get" are probably best and most commonly used.

    Trentina summed it up correctly, I think: "As GenJen wrote several posts ago, you simply don't hear "insert" in conjunction with "breast implants." It may not be wrong grammatically, but I think we've been discussing usage, and it's not used that way. Instead, one either gets (not obtains) breast implants, has her breasts done, or has breast augmentation surgery. I think that's pretty much the end of the story."
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    My favourite is "to have mammary enhancement", but Google only credits it with two entries (one of them Australian-related, for what it is worth).

    "Have breast augmentation" - 38,800: a decent contender

    "Get breast augmentation" - 687: a poor relation

    "Get a boob job" - 67,400: a popular (and colloquial) formula

    "Get bigger tits" - 636 only, to my surprise

    "Look like a Page Three girl" - 32 entries

    "Look like a Page 3 girl" - 39 entries

    All searches with "Get the exact phrase" function in "Advanced Search".

    For non-British readers not familiar with "Page 3" references - just ask. A moderator will be glad to send you to the relevant website and/or some relevant graphic material. :p
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    french4beth said:
    I am convinced that 'obtain breast implants' is a valid option (apparently I'm not the only one as I got over 1,540,000 hits on google using the above phrase - including nationalreviewofmedicine.com, ehow.net, breast-cancer-research.com and plasticsurgery.net web sites: [/URL]=).

    Hi
    I can only give you a subjective native AE usage opinion. By the way, this is a great thread, it really makes you think.
    You are right, there is nothing grammatically wrong with the words you propose to use, though to me "obtain breast implants" means to buy breast implants at a store. Obtain is a word used by lawyers or in terms of being granted formal permission for something.

    If you are asking if it sounds "native" or natural to the ear I can only tell you that I would be certain this was a translation from another language & not a good one.
    It is stilted & so overly precise and yet awkward as to be mark itself as a translation.

    If you are looking for a phrase that sounds discreet or well-educated use the "breast augmentation surgery" phrase suggested above, it is polite & accurate. It is a phrase you could use in conversation with anyone without fear of offending them.

    If you are being funny or critical or sarcastic or vulgar or teenager-ish use "got fake boobs", "got a boob job", "got her boobs done". "Got" is used casually in place of "had". The "mammalian enhancement" suggestion is pretty funny too.

    I don't want to sound too conservative but if you are trying to sound sophisticated in the sense of being well bred & polite you wouldn't be mentioning her breasts at all.

    -
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    Admittedly, the aim of breast-enhancement procedures is that the end-result should be gazed at (by others) but not talked about (by anyone, lest the secret of how such an impressive result was obtained should come out).:)
     
    James Brandon said:
    Admittedly, the aim of breast-enhancement procedures is that the end-result should be gazed at (by others) but not talked about (by anyone, lest the secret of how such an impressive result was obtained should come out).:)

    Words are superfluous here James since it's obvious that these silicone mounds are not natural, especially the large industrial size. A nudge and a wink would suffice. ;)



    LRV
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    Queen Vic,
    A wink, perhaps; I would avoid the good old nudge, however, tempting as it may be - those artificial constructs might explode in your face, if nudged too much!:eek:
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    I did not know "The Sun" of the UK was against breast implants... But they are not against large bosoms, that is for sure. No doubt this is their way of being environmentally friendly (silicone is a polluting substance) and politically correct (i.e. aware of "issues"). That's me reassured.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, The Sun certainly slipped up! ...The Sun, which had recently decided on a "natural beauty" policy, requiring all its models to be "silicon-free"
    Guess they didn't know about saline implants: silicone free!
     

    James Brandon

    Senior Member
    English + French - UK
    "Saline implants" - is that when you pump water into them? Well, this Thread, apart from generating phenomenal interest (I wonder why) is also full of surprises... What about custard, say? :p
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top