Get depended vs. addicted

jokaec

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong
A: Why do you look so sleepy?
B: I am suffering from insomnia recently.
A: Why do you not take some sleeping pills?
B: I don't want to get "depended" or "addicted" to it.


At they both correct and the same? If so, which is better in this situation? Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    At they both correct and the same?
    No and No.

    1. Try to avoid the "get" passive - use "become."

    2. Noun and pronoun must agree!
    A: Why do you not take some sleeping pills?
    B: I don't want to get "depended" become dependent upon or become addicted to it them.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    Firstly, it is better if you say "I have been suffering from", rather than "I am suffering from..."

    B: I don't want to become dependent upon them/become addicted to them. You can use either word, though. "Addicted" is probably more common, but they mean the same thing.


    Cross-posted with PaulQ.
     

    jokaec

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong
    Thank you very much PaulQ and Dretagoto. I guess "get passive verb" is wrong here because of "passive verb" must be an action rather than a status. For instance, "get started". Am I right?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Get" meaning "become" is quite different from the "get passive" that you can see in a sentence like "I got run over by a bus" (an alternative to the passive that means almost exactly the same as "I was run over by a bus").
    Get passive - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary

    Jokaec, I don't know why you say "get started" is passive. "Get" is rather similar to "become" in the second sentence:

    He got me started on the project -
    not passive. It means "He started me off on the project.
    I got started on the project - I started work on the project.
     

    DrChen

    Senior Member
    French-France
    I don't know GreenWhiteBlue, maybe it is a generation thing? I often hear things like "I'm not gonna get dragged into this", "he got smacked"... And if you type "get addicted to" on Google, you find many entries. Google Ngram seems to say it started to appear from the 60's on.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's not a generational thing. "Get" isn't a passive form in this context. Conventional, traditional English "I do not wish to become addicted to these pills". Colloquial English "I don't want to get addicted to these pills".

    The passive use of 'get' is also common in colloquial English, but that's not what we have in this thread.
    "I am not going to get dragged into this." = "I am not going to be dragged into this." Note 'be' not 'become'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If you can add an agent, it's a case of the "get passive":
    I'm not going to get dragged into this by anyone. He got smacked on the head by his English teacher.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    Getting back to the original question, I don't personally see anything wrong with saying in what is, after all, a conversation between friends:
    B: "I don't want to get addicted to them" ("sleeping pills" is plural ;)).

    It's possibly slightly more awkward to say:
    B: "I don't want to get dependent on them", but it is the sort of thing people do sometimes say informally. :)
     
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