Get discouraged Vs lose your motivation

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Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

What would be the difference between the phrases "get discouraged" and "lose your motivation" (my meaning intended: not want (much) to do something anymore) in the example I made below?

a. If you don't get any results, you eventually get discouraged about studying a second language.

Vs

b. If you don't get any results, you eventually lose your motivation to study a second language.

My opinion: I think "lose your motivation" is stronger, more emphatic. It implies not wanting at all. Whereas, "get discouraged" is less emphatic and would mean you're just a little disillusioned.

Thank you in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    My opinion: I think "lose your motivation" is stronger, more emphatic. It implies not wanting at all. Whereas, "get discouraged" is less emphatic and would mean you're just a little disillusioned.
    This opinion make sense to me, Xavier. I also think it sounds more emphatic to say that you "lose your motivation."
     
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