get down / take off

kanu

Senior Member
I think, this question may be disgusting but I have to ask. :D

Before sitting on WC in toilet, I will get my pants down or I will take my pants off ( but I'm little afraid of using this because I'm not completely taking off pants.)
 
  • Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    I would say you pull down your pants. You're correct that 'take off' is used when you remove your pants completely. You may want to pull down your underwear too :)
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    Yes, but pants are underwear in British English. Indian English follows British English for the most part. :)
    They're not to my British parents. But that's a different thread...

    Anyway, I wouldn't say 'get my pants down' either. There comes a point where it doesn't matter whether or not something is grammatically correct. What's important is the way people actually talk.
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    But I'm a learner that's why, I wanted to ask.
    They're not to my British parents. But that's a different thread...

    Anyway, I wouldn't say 'get my pants down' either. There comes a point where it doesn't matter whether or not something is grammatically correct. What's important is the way people actually talk.
     

    Gwan

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    People are not avoiding your question because they are being deliberately difficult. Got is a very complicated word which can be used in some contexts but not others, with different nuances of meaning.

    "I got my pants down" is a grammatically correct sentence, but what is important is that it is not a natural thing to say in the context you have described.

    I might say "I got my pants down" if I wanted to say something like "I succeeded in pulling my pants down after some difficulty". For example, I've put a pair of pants on which are much too small for me and the zip has broken (I'm presuming 'pants' means 'trousers' and not 'underwear', as soundshift kindly pointed out). I might say something like "It took me 20 minutes of trying, but I finally got my pants down (or off)". In normal circumstances, I would NOT say "I got my pants down to go to the toilet".
     

    kanu

    Senior Member
    Ok, it is clear to me.
    My dog was on the roof.I got him down from the roof because it was raining.

    Even it is also suggesting I faced difficulty to bring my dog off the roof.
    People are not avoiding your question because they are being deliberately difficult. Got is a very complicated word which can be used in some contexts but not others, with different nuances of meaning.

    "I got my pants down" is a grammatically correct sentence, but what is important is that it is not a natural thing to say in the context you have described.

    I might say "I got my pants down" if I wanted to say something like "I succeeded in pulling my pants down after some difficulty". For example, I've put a pair of pants on which are much too small for me and the zip has broken (I'm presuming 'pants' means 'trousers' and not 'underwear', as soundshift kindly pointed out). I might say something like "It took me 20 minutes of trying, but I finally got my pants down (or off)". In normal circumstances, I would NOT say "I got my pants down to go to the toilet".
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Ok, it is clear to me.
    My dog was on the roof.I got him down from the roof because it was raining.

    Even it is also suggesting I faced difficulty to bring my dog off the roof.
    No, here the suggestion is that you got the dog down from the roof because you didn't want him to get wet. There is no suggestion here (in the use of 'got') that you faced any difficulty doing so.

    This is yet another example of the nuances a word like 'got' can have, and the difficulty in taking a meaning fom one context to another.
     
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