get drunk

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Ume

Banned
Japanese
Hello.

- Throw back your drinks, and you will soon get drunk.
Is it okay to say "go to your head" in place of "get drunk"?
Is "get sloshed" more common to British English speakers?
 
  • johnp

    Senior Member
    "Go to you head" means when you start drinking, say on an empty stomach, the alcohol goes right to your head and you start to feel the effects of the alcohol. You aren't really drunk at that point. What do you mean by "Throw back your drinks"? "Sloshed" in common in AE.
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    I understand "throw back your drinks," johnp. It means to toss them back, guzzle them quickly, like taking a shot.
    You could say "it (the alcohol) will go to your head" (NOT "you will go to your head"), but johnp is right--it means when you first start to feel the effects of the alcohol. We also call being a little bit drunk "tipsy."
    There are many ways to say "drunk," such as "hammered," "sloshed," etc, but I'm sure there's another thread on it. "Drunk" is by far the most standard word.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Throw back drinks" to me means downing drinks fast (probably in one swallow) and in rapid succession.

    EDIT: my post crossed with Esca's;-)
     

    Esca

    Senior Member
    ATX
    USA - English
    Thanks a lot, all.

    Do you say "get intoxicated" instead of "get drunk"?
    Intoxicated and inebriated are both more formal ways to say drunk. If I were writing a textbook, or making a police report, I would say one of the formal words. If I were talking to my friend, I would use "drunk" or one of its other casual synonyms (buzzed, sloshed, etc.).

    (Actually, I do use "inebriated" in day-to-day speech, but I'm weird and like using big words :D)
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hi, all. Mind if I ask the same thing again? Is the word "sloshed" common in American English?
     

    johnp

    Senior Member
    Yes, it's also common here, but maybe not as much for the younger generation. In fact, in my classroom I asked the students, aged 17, if they ever heard the word sloshed for drunk and they said never. One girl in the class is from England and she said she never heard it either.
     

    gasman

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Could I throw in "He got himself 'tight as a lord' at the celebration last night"?
     
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