"get in" in the context of exercise/workout

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Brave Heart, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Hi all,

    I don't quite understand the meaning of "get...in" in the following sentences.
    Do they mean something like "make it a point/habit to" ?

    1. "And with race-walking, it's easier to get motivated. Race-walking is a civil way to get your exercise in."

    2. "Though Jones gets in a morning walk, she prefers to work out at health clubs that feature hiking programs."

    3. "(She) gets up an extra 30-45 minutes in the morning to get in her four workouts a week."
     
  2. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    "Get your exercise in" means to reach an implicit goal of exercising.
    can mean attain, achieve, obtain, accumulate, or reach, depending on the case.

    In the last example, there is a certain connotation of "squeezing in," since she is making extra time available in order to achieve her exercise goal.
     
  3. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Thanks bibliolept. I appreciate your help. :)

    Is my understanding correct that "get your exercise in" can be interchangeable with "work out" in the above context and that "get in" in #2 also has a connotation of "squeezing in" ?
     
  4. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español

    Yes; the first meaning you describe applies to the first example; the second one applies to the second and third examples.
     
  5. Brave Heart Senior Member

    Japan, Japanese
    Thanks bibliolept. :)
     
  6. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    One final comment: in your first example, "civil" does not sound like the right word; generally "civil" is used as a synonym for "polite."
     

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