Get In Over his Head to a Gambler

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Hello.

Could anyone please confirm my interpretation? The expression in red --- could it be broken into 'got in over his head' and 'to a gambler,' meaning 'got in trouble with a gambler'? I'd appreciate it if you would help me.
RACHEL:My boyfriend, he's gone missing.
OLIVIA: Well, as you can see, I'm kinda busy.
RACHEL: He got in over his head to a gambler, a guy named Big Eddie. I'm afraid something bad may have happened to him.
(Fringe, Brown Betty)
Warmly,

Hiro
 
  • Thomas Veil

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yeah, it you've broken it down correctly. "Got in over his head" means "got into a situation whose difficulty exceeds one's ability to deal with it". In this context, it probably means that he bet more than he could afford to pay back.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Could anyone please confirm my interpretation? The expression in red --- could it be broken into 'got in over his head' and 'to a gambler,' meaning 'got in trouble with a gambler'? I'd appreciate it if you would help me.
    RACHEL:My boyfriend, he's gone missing.
    OLIVIA: Well, as you can see, I'm kinda busy.
    RACHEL: He got in over his head to a gambler, a guy named Big Eddie. I'm afraid something bad may have happened to him.
    (Fringe, Brown Betty)

    This specifically means that the boyfriend is in debt to Big Eddie, well beyond his financial resources. Guys named "Big Eddie" in stories like this are usually inclined to express their annoyance physically when people owe them large sums of money and fail to pay them. Hence, Rachel's concern.
     
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