get + infinitive

Discussion in 'English Only' started by gabriel001234, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    "When the chat is full of jerks, we get to ban a lot of people, which I hate to do."

    What does get mean in that context? "Bring about"? "Have the opportunity to do?" "Be enabled"? "Cause"? "Be able"?
     
  2. Vronsky

    Vronsky Senior Member

    Russian - Russia
    Some people can use get instead of any other verb. Here it seems that get replaced have.
     
  3. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - America
    When the chat is full of jerks, we get the task of banning a lot people.

    The task is ours to do, since we are the chat room moderators.
     
  4. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    I'm not sure about this use of the verb "get to", which I perceive as typically AE.

    Is this an unusual use of "get to", doji? I usually see it with the meaning "have the (welcome) opportunity to..." Here it appears to be more negative.
     
  5. dojibear Senior Member

    Fresno CA
    English - America
    Yes, in AE "get to" usually means "have the welcome opportunity to". And it sounds like that, the way the example sentence in #1 is worded. I had to re-read the sentence twice before it suddenly "meant something different" to me, with a different sense of "get to".

    "Get to" is also used to talk about tasks, in the sense of an area of responsibility. "When this needs to be done, we are the ones who get to do it." It is often phrased more clearly as something like:

    ...we get the task of banning a lot of people.
    ...we get the job of banning a lot of people.

    In #1, that is shortened to the (confusing) phrase:

    ...we get to ban a lot of people.
     
  6. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    I think it may have this meaning:
    "Get to do something"
     
  7. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    If it does have that meaning here, Vic, the speaker sabotages any attempt at irony by adding "which I hate to do".
     
  8. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    I just guessed that banning a lot of people is boring, so it made sense. As to the losing of the irony... maybe the speaker just wanted to be utterly clear, in case someone didn't get the irony:)
    Just a guess.
     
  9. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    Yes, or we could go for the simpler explanation and accept that the writer really meant to say this:

     
  10. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Is there any dictionary that shows get as "have" with the same meaning you guys were talking about?
     
  11. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    When the moderators "get" the task of banning those jerks, they then "have" that task to do.


    When the chat is full of jerks, we get to ban the job of banning/lumbered with banning a lot of people, which I hate to do.

    If you get something given to you, even if you don't want it, it is then something that you have.
    We get (receive or acquire) the job of banning - it is given to us to ban - we have the job of banning.
     
  12. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    But is it really the simpler way?...
    I mean, we see that the usual meaning of "to get to do something" doesn't fit, so we modify the phrase so that it had a little different meaning...
     
  13. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    When the writer is someone who comes up with something like this, then yes:

    When the chat is full of jerks...

    If the writer seems to be otherwise perfectly competent, I would search deeper.
     
  14. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    :DI see.
     
  15. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    I know but I would like to find a dictionary that showed me that use of get when it is a intransitive verb in the same way as in the sentence that a gaming streamer said during a livestream on Twitch. Is there any dictionary that includes that use of "get" in the meanings of the verb?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  16. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    Do you mean the usage "get to do something"?
     
  17. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Yes, but with the same meaning that you were talking about ("have to do something").
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  18. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
  19. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Thanks for answering my question. Just one more thing: was my sentence unclear or gramatically incorrect (the one before my answer to your question)?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  20. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    Hmm..."a dictionary that will show me that use [...] in the same way as in the sentence that a gaming streamer said during a livestream on Twitch" - it had me puzzled, because I don't think you mentioned this context before. Your sentence was a little awkward, but understandable.
     
  21. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Thanks for your answer. Also, the meaning of "get to do" that is in the dictionary you recommended to me doesn't seem to apply to what the streamer said ("I get to ban a lot of people..."). So can you send me a link to a dictionary which shows the same usage of the expression "get to do something" that was used in the sentence said by the streamer, please? Again, thanks for your help!
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  22. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    But isn't that what dojibear and I have been saying? The original "get to do" isn't appropriate for what we presume was the intended meaning of this guy you call "the streamer".
     
  23. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    You two said that it means "have to do something", but I couldn't find anything like that on the Internet. The link you sent to me shows "get to do" in the form of "have the opportunity to do", but I wanted something that showed it in the form of "have to do".
     
  24. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    I thought this was fairly simple? My take on "get to [do something]" is that it's extremely versatile and can be either positive or negative.

    My ex-wife has custody of the kids, so I only get to see them once a month.
    Yay! Next summer we get to go to Disneyland at last!
    Oh typical! Everyone else has gone to bed, so I get to do all the clearing up.
    So, when do we get to meet your new boyfriend?
     
  25. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Does the third sentence mean "I have to do" and do the others mean "I have the opportunity"?
     
  26. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    The third sentence is more like in the quote in #6.
     
  27. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Do I need to use the auxiliary "do" when I connect two questions with "and" and the second one asks about a different person/thing, or can I leave it out?
    "Does the first sentence mean XYZ and the others mean ABC?"
    OR
    "Does the first sentence mean XYZ and do the others mean ABC?"
     
  28. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Yes. But that wasn't intentional — I was just giving random examples of usage. Let's redress the balance:

    It's not fair that I only ever get to wear my sister's hand-me-downs.
    How come I always get to play the back-end of the pantomime horse?​
     
  29. srk Senior Member

    South Bend, Indiana
    English - US
    These are sarcastic uses of "get to," which in my experience is only positive in ordinary use.

    I can only make sense of "get to" in the quote in the OP as sarcasm.
    Edit:
    Edit: Added the blue "in" which gabriel saw missing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
  30. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    What does "I can only make sense of" mean? "Understand"?
     
  31. srk Senior Member

    South Bend, Indiana
    English - US
    Yes.
     
  32. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    I don't see the line in the OP as sarcastic. Nor was any sarcasm intended in my examples, which were simply meant to demonstrate ways in which the idiom "get to [do something]" is frequently used. Admittedly there may well be a British/American divide, but I don't feel the need to pin the phrase down to any one meaning.
     
  33. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    Then did you say "I can only understand 'get to' the quote in the OP as sarcasm"? Is a preposition supposed to be before "quote" ?
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
  34. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    1. It's not fair that I only ever get to wear my sister's hand-me-downs.
    2. How come I always get to play the back-end of the pantomime horse?
    3. My ex-wife has custody of the kids, so I only get to see them once a month.
    4. Yay! Next summer we get to go to Disneyland at last!
    5. Oh typical! Everyone else has gone to bed, so I get to do all the clearing up.
    6. So, when do we get to meet your new boyfriend?

    In my opinion, all these are the "opportunity" examples, 2 and 5 being the "sarcastic" ones. If we change "always" to "only" in 2, it'll become a normal example, like 1. Do I correctly undresrand?...
     
  35. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    2. How come I always have to play the back-end of the pantomime horse?
    5. Oh typical! Everyone else has gone to bed, so I have to do all the clearing up.

    Change get to have and you can see how these work. I don't see them as implying "opportunity" (and I think talk of sarcasm is a red herring). The expression can be used in different ways. That's the only point I'm trying to make.
     
  36. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    But what does OP means?
     
  37. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Oh, sorry, I have just noticed srk's post #29, which I seem to have almost repeated!
     
  38. srk Senior Member

    South Bend, Indiana
    English - US
    Yes. I brain-dropped an "in" before "quote."
     
  39. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    You may choose from what you've received in this thread:
    1. the sarcastic meaning of "to have an opportunity"
    2. "to get to do" = "to have to do"
    3. to get the task/job of banning
     
  40. gabriel001234 Senior Member

    Portuguese
    I think that each meaning has to be examined separately, but I think the second meaning is the one that can be applied perfectly to what the sentence is supposed to mean. But what does OP mean?
     
  41. PaulQ

    PaulQ Senior Member

    UK
    English - England
    OP = Original Poster -> the person who made the first post... in this case, you. :)
     
  42. VicNicSor

    VicNicSor Senior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    I, personally, always use "OP" regarding myself meaning "original post" (i.e. post #1 in my thread); more specifically -- the quote posted in #1.
     
  43. lingobingo

    lingobingo Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    The problem is that OP is used to mean both original post and original poster. Very annoying!
     
  44. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)

    Your examples all seem very natural.

    When the chat is full of jerks, we get to ban a lot of people, -
    I was wondering whether this doesn't imply that "we get to ban" is positive. I would read it as positive, but "which I hate to do" shows us that it's intended to be negative. Part of the problem is that many people would assume that moderators do enjoy the opportunity of banning people.

    "Oh typical! Everyone else has gone to bed, so I get to do all the clearing up." This is good, because it shows from the start that "get to do" is negative here.
     

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