get inspired

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hello everyone, one of my friend told me he didn't know how to write an essay now, he used to be good at it, and I told him:


Try to relax yourself then you will get inspired.


I wonder "Get inspired" here makes sense?


Because I check it out on my favorite dictionary, I saw "inspired" only follows an noun, but I think I am right this time?


Thanks
 
  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "Get inspired" does not sound idiomatic to me. However, there are several verbs that could precede "inspired" or "inspiration", according to the context. What is the situation here?
     
    Last edited:

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hello All, I recall where the phrase comes from, it was from my textbook when I was a fresher. The situation is like two friedns (a pair of friends) were walking on the street when all of a sudden A said "My God, it is really hard to pick up a gift for Mary", then B replied "Be patient then you'll get inspired"
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Silver. One idiomatic way to phrase this would be: If you can relax, then maybe something will come to you. Or: If you relax, it will be easier to get/be inspired. I see that Major Bloodnock didn't like "get inspired", but I hear it and similar things here in the US. We may be a little looser with our use of "get" over here. :)
     
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