get it off

  • Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Either this is a BE expression I'm not familiar with, or it's one of two other, similar, expressions.
    To hit it off means they liked each other, and they got along well (it could turn into a relationship, given time).
    If someone gets him off or gets her off, it means that there was some type of sexual activity, and one person gave the other person an orgasm. This generally is not simple sex. It's more often applied to oral sex, manual manipulation, or some other sexual stimulation.
     

    Risenape

    Member
    English - Australian
    Hello amigos!

    Susan and Tom got it off at the party.

    Does it mean that they were making out or they were snogging?

    Thanks,

    Sam:cool:
    It means they became sexually intimate. I don't think the extent of the intimacy is explicit in the phrase.
    This is different from Cypherpunk's correct explanation of "to get someone off".
    You could also say "Susan and Tom got it on at the party."
    "Susan and Tom had it off at the party." This means they had intercourse.

    There's obviously a lot of room for embarassing misunderstandings with these phrasal verbs!
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    It looks to me like a (perhaps undeliberate) amalgamation of get it on and hit it off ... maybe even with a bit of have it off thrown in for good measure.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Risenape is an AusE speaker, and he was familiar with the phrase. I have several Canadian friends who are perfectly familiar with the phrase (though that may be due to long exposure to AE).
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, I noticed Risenape's familiarity with the phrase, but I thought perhaps it had a slightly different meaning in Australia, since he says that it doesn't specify the degree of intimacy. In AE that is exactly what the phrase makes explicit. It appears that in Australian English "had it off" would have that meaning.

    I don't insist, however, that it is an exclusively AE usage. I only meant to allow for differences.
     

    equivoque

    Senior Member
    Australia - English
    It means they became sexually intimate. I don't think the extent of the intimacy is explicit in the phrase.
    That is exactly what I assumed. It doesn't necessarily mean they had intercourse but they definitely shared more than a drink.
     
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