get low

  • Mirlo

    Senior Member
    Castellano, Panamá/ English-USA
    Ps estaba hablando con una chica de cuando ella bailaba y me dijo "I got low" !

    Es dificil de traducir, pero significa cuando bailaba se bajo, tu sabes cuando doblas las rodillas y te vas bajando poco a poco...
    En pocas palabras es una forma de bailar.




    Espero ayude,
     
    Last edited:

    CA1164902

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hola,
    I've heard when there's a fire, you have to get low and go.
    I take it that you "get low" to be in a closer position to crawl outside your door.
    Can I say "don't get low to pick up that coin"?
    Is it better to say don't "bend down" to pick up that coin or don't "bend over"...
    Which one's best?

    Thank you much.
     

    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Hola,
    I've heard when there's a fire, you have to get low and go.
    I take it that you "get low" to be in a closer position to crawl outside your door.
    Can I say "don't get low to pick up that coin"?
    Is it better to say don't "bend down" to pick up that coin or don't "bend over"...
    Which one's best?

    Thank you much.

    Don't "bend down" or "bend over" would be the usual way to say it. "Get low and go" was presumably chosen as a slogan because of the rhyme, but in addition "bending down" is not the same as "crawling" on all fours.
     

    elirlandes

    Senior Member
    Ireland English
    Bend down / bend over are more current than "get low".

    "Get low and go" is the sort of thing that is often used (especially in the USA) to teach children as it is easier to remember because of the rhyme. "Get down on the ground and get out as quickly as possible" is not as catchy.

    I would translate as "agachate y sal".
     

    CA1164902

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Thanks Chris. Also thanks for the nuance.
    BTW, I've also heard "I lean over to tie my shoes". Did I get this right?

    Does it really make any difference whether I say "lean over", "bend over" or "bend down", because "lean" to me is more like "rest".

    Thank you.
     

    CA1164902

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Gracias, elirlandes.
    I understand then, "agáchate" = get low.
    That's why I was somehow confused, because, I thought "agachate" = bend down / bend over.

    gracias.
     

    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Thanks Chris. Also thanks for the nuance.
    BTW, I've also heard "I lean over to tie my shoes". Did I get this right?

    Does it really make any difference whether I say "lean over", "bend over" or "bend down", because "lean" to me is more like "rest".

    Thank you.

    Bend would be a better choice. Bend is like doblar; lean more like inclinar.
     
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