get off the hook

mashburn

Member
Chinese
I attended a webex meeting with partner last night. I was involved in a project with this partner to help them out until they got some appropriate person to do this job.
So I asked the partner " if the new hire coming onboard, can I get off the hook? " And then the partner suddenly cracked up... I just don't get my head around what's wrong
with what I have said. Does "get off the hook" have some hidden meanings?
 
  • Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    I attended a webex meeting with partner last night. I was involved in a project with this partner to help them out until they got some appropriate person to do this job.
    So I asked the partner " if the new hire coming onboard, can I get off the hook? " And then the partner suddenly cracked up... I just don't get my head around what's wrong
    with what I have said. Does "get off the hook" have some hidden meanings?
    Getting off the hook implies getting away from something very undesirable.

    Your partner probably cracked up because he/she thought you were leaving the appropriate person in a poor situation deliberately.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's had for us to know for sure. Maybe the best thing to do is ask him/her. Is your partner a native speaker? And if so, where do they come from? (Cross-posted)
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I attended a webex meeting with a partner last night. I was involved in a project with this partner to help them out until they got some appropriate person to do this job.
    So I asked the partner " if the new hire is coming onboard, can I get off the hook? " And then the partner suddenly cracked up... I just don't get my head around what's wrong
    with what I have said. Does "get off the hook" have some hidden meanings?
    Hello. First of all, I have made a couple of very minor additions to what is an otherwise excellent piece of writing.

    Now to your question. I know of no "hidden meaning" to the expression. I don't understand what your partner thought was so funny. I would like to mention that I don't usually hear "get off the hook" although this is, in my mind at least, not a big deal. I think I would have said it this way: "If the new hire is coming on board, am I off the hook?" or "... can you let me off the hook?"

    Let's see what others have to say about this.
     

    mashburn

    Member
    Chinese
    Ok, it seems I over-used this phrase. I just want to express if I can be back to my normal job after hiring the right person. Anyway, thanks for your explanation, It gets across to me clearly!
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    mashburn

    Member
    Chinese
    Hello. First of all, I have made a couple of very minor additions to what is an otherwise excellent piece of writing.

    Now to your question. I know of no "hidden meaning" to the expression. I don't understand what your partner thought was so funny. I would like to mention that I don't usually hear "get off the hook" although this is, in my mind at least, not a big deal. I think I would have said it this way: "If the new hire is coming on board, am I off the hook?" or "... can you let me off the hook?"

    Let's see what others have to say about this.
    Hi Kayokid, thanks a million for your prompt response and even correcting my writings. I don't realize the difference between " be off the hook" and "get off the hook" until you put it across to me. But "be off the hook" really sounds a little bit soft, isn't it? I think Smauler is right, The partner might misunderstand I wanted to get away from the job as quick as I can.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, I think she is. She works based in New York but I have no idea where she is from.
    Okay, fair enough.
    For some people 'getting off the hook' could mean the same as getting trashed on drugs and booze, so some potential for amusement there.
    For others, and in a related way I suppose, it can mean you're crazy, eg. 'You're totally off the hook, my friend'.
    I think I've also seen it used as a general term of approval, eg. 'Wow, this place is totally off the hook, dude!' (yes, well maybe not 'dude' :))
     

    kayokid

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    For some people 'getting off the hook' could mean the same as getting trashed on drugs and booze, so some potential for amusement there.
    For others, and in a related way I suppose, it can mean you're crazy, eg. 'You're totally off the hook, my friend'.
    I think I've also seen it used as a general term of approval, eg. 'Wow, this place is totally off the hook, dude!' (yes, well maybe not 'dude' :))
    I have never heard this expression used to mean any of these.
     

    mashburn

    Member
    Chinese
    Okay, fair enough.
    For some people 'getting off the hook' could mean the same as getting trashed on drugs and booze, so some potential for amusement there.
    For others, and in a related way I suppose, it can mean you're crazy, eg. 'You're totally off the hook, my friend'.
    I think I've also seen it used as a general term of approval, eg. 'Wow, this place is totally off the hook, dude!' (yes, well maybe not 'dude' :))
    OMG, I wish she hadn't thought the way she did:p
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have never heard this expression used to mean any of these.
    I thought that I'd catch a little flak for it, but heh! Check out the 'urbanistas' at their repository of half-baked usages (Urban Slang 'off the hook').

    1. cool; happening "That party was off the hook!"
    2. Off the hook is actually a modernization of a series of slang words. Closely related to off the chain, there refering to something being so "fresh" and "new" that it's literally right off the store shelf. (started in reference to clothes, the hangar being the hook)
    "Them shoes are off the hook dog."
    And at that point the site went down.
     
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