Get off track vs Go off track

Mustermisstler

Senior Member
Spanish.Spain

Hello everyone,

I have a question about the idioms "get off track" and "go off track". Do they mean the same?

A bit of context will help :

1a)Her political career went off track when she was defeated in last year's election.
1b)Her political career got off track when she was defeated in last year's election.

2a) Soon after that, our conversation got off track and turned ugly.
2b) Soon after that, our conversation went off track and turned ugly,

Thanks and happy new year!
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    For me, go off track and get off track mean the same thing.

    A happy new year to you too!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Went off track" sounds better to my ears for both 1) and 2). At the moment I can't think of a context in which I could use "get off track".

    Season's greetings

    I agree. Only "went off track" really works for me, though I don't have a real problem with "got" or "gotten", but "gone" works better for me.

    It seems to me that we have gotten [gone] off track here, and we should concentrate on our primary objectives.

    You got of track there; concentrate on your primary objectives.
     
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