get older employees up to speed and with the proverbial program in area that are second nature

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kazuhiko fudaba

Senior Member
Japanese
In my English learning text book, there is a sentence in the conversatino as follows.

Older executives are paired with and mentored by younger employees. Reverse mentoring helps
get older employees up to speed and with the proverbial program in areas that are second nature
to digital natives.

Question) Can be the bold phrase rephrased as "get older employees with the proverbial program" ?
and please explain the phrase "get older employees with the program"

Thank you

Kazu Fudaba
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t know what’s meant by “the proverbial program”. But in terms of grammar, this sentence appears to be missing a word:

    Reverse mentoring helps get older employees up to speed and familiar with the proverbial program in areas that are second nature to digital natives.​
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I don’t know what’s meant by “the proverbial program”. But in terms of grammar, this sentence appears to be missing a word:
    No, I think it's right (if slangy). "To get with the program" is a set phrase, at least in U.S. English, meaning, roughly, to start behaving in an appropriate and productive way:

    "Johnny isn't doing his homework and doesn't pay attention in class. He needs to get with the program."

    The word "proverbial" just clarifies that the "program" in question is the one from the set phrase, which in the writer's mind, at least, is so well known as to have become comparable to a proverb. Much as one might refer to "the proverbial stitch in time."

    Kind of a dumb sentence, if you ask me, but it does make sense as written.
     
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