Get on the board (sports)

Biker

Senior Member
SPAIN - Native Spanish
Hi there :)

Can Any1 help me with the meaning of "Get on the board" in sports terms?

For instance:

" The Lakers get on the board by turning a takeaway into two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup."

Thanks in advance and happy christmas !!!
 
  • juandiego

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    Bueno, no estoy nada seguro de varias cosas pero me voy a arriesgar:
    Los del lago:) cotinúan en el marcador convirtiendo un robo de balón en dos puntos abajo con una bandeja de LW.
     

    mikey21

    Senior Member
    Română - România
    Yo estoy seguro, pero sólo puedo expicarlo en inglés

    get on the board = put your team on the score board = to score the first point(s) in a game for your team (at that point, the other team may or may not have already scored)

    ie The Lakers scored their first basket of the game by turning a takeaway (steal) into two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup. At that point the Suns were already up by 10 points.

    Supongo que en castellano es marcar la primera canasta por su equipo.

    Ahora entiendo las palabras "los del lago" (lake-ers) *un fan de los Fénix Suns riendo* :D
     
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    Biker

    Senior Member
    SPAIN - Native Spanish
    Thanks anybody "for your replays" :thumbsup:

    Me da que es como "meterse en el partido"/"comenzar a anotar"

    La definición de Mikey parece la más acertada.

    De todas formas, algún nativo de EEUU seguro que nos aporta la definición exacta.

    Gracias de nuevo
     

    JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod
    Mexican Spanish
    "Los del Lago" es buena, Juan Diego.

    Acá se suele decir "Los del Lago movieron el marcador" (también "movieron la pizarra").

    Reciban un saludo.
     

    mikey21

    Senior Member
    Română - România
    Ok, but then, what does "...two points off of Luke Walton" mean?
    "two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup" = two points off the driving layup by Walton jr = two points from a driving layup by Walton jr

    Translated into boring English, it sounds like this: The Lakers scored their first points of the game by stealing the ball and finishing the play (ie fastbreak) with a driving layup by Walton jr.

    Another question; is it right the translation driving layup as bandeja?
    Guess so
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=311350
    http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=650423
     
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    juandiego

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    "two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup" = two points off the driving layup by Walton jr = two points from a driving layup by Walton jr

    Translated into boring English, it sounds like this: The Lakers scored their first points of the game by stealing the ball and finishing the play (ie fastbreak) with a driving layup by Walton jr.
    Thank you for the answer, mikey21.
    Still not clear to me, sorry. I got the general meaning from the start but...
    Why off and of together? I guess the "from" sense you mention is provided by "of", if so, what "off" conveys right there after "points"? Doesn't it mean behind or ahead at the score?
     

    JeSuisSnob

    Ombudsmod
    Mexican Spanish
    Thank you for the answer, mikey21.
    Still not clear to me, sorry. I got the general meaning from the start but...
    Why off and of together? I guess the "from" sense you mention is provided by "of", if so, what "off" conveys right there after "points"? Doesn't it mean behind or ahead at the score?
    I have the same doubt, Juan Diego. Let's see if some native helps.
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Thank you for the answer, mikey21.
    Still not clear to me, sorry. I got the general meaning from the start but...
    Why off and of together? I guess the "from" sense you mention is provided by "of", if so, what "off" conveys right there after "points"? Doesn't it mean behind or ahead at the score?
    The short answer, in my opinion, is that "of" doesn't add to or change the meaning in any way.

    ...two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup.
    means the same as
    ...two points off Luke Walton's driving layup.

    The second one sounds more colloquial to me. Here's a related thread with a similar discussion about "off of": http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=841293

    My intuition tells me that the second one sounds more colloquial because I hear it spoken in informal situations, but I suspect that it would not be accepted by my editor or my English teacher. However, I don't know of any rule that might explain why one is more "correct" than another. Sorry to say it, but this is one case where we just say it, but we don't know why. :eek:
     

    mikey21

    Senior Member
    Română - România
    Why off and of together?
    Sorry about that, but you bolded "points off" and not "off of", so I misunderstood you.

    Doesn't it mean behind or ahead on the scoreboard?
    No, it has nothing to do with being ahead or behind, the only thing that the phrase tells us about the score is that it was the first made basket for the Lakers. However, we can infer that they were behind, because "get on the board" is generally used in those situations, ie you will seldom hear someone say it when the score is 2-0 or 2-2.

    The only time that I heard "get on the board" in a situation where the team who scored was ahead, was when it described the first basket of the game, as in: "and the Suns get on the board with only 4 seconds into the game" *Suns fan remembering the D'Antoni era*

    More frequently, a broadcaster will say this phrase: "[player] scores on the [layup/dunk/3/etc] and [team] finally get on the board" (Marv Albert used to say it with a very nice stess on finally). The word "finally" shows that they missed several opportunities to score before finally doing so.

    (Just because I get the feeling that I will be asked later on, yes I do watch every Suns game (in English), even those on FSN AZ or My45, either live or the very next day)
     

    juandiego

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    Thank you, fenixpollo.
    I have a couple of questions on the matter.

    The thread of the link you've put above is about the construction "verb + off + of".
    "The Lakers get on the board by turning a takeaway into two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup". Is this case in question of the same construction? I mean, is "off" directly complementing the verb "turning" despite the phrase between them? [I think the answer is no way; turn off?!!!].

    From the same thread you've provided us, I'll pick an example: Survive off of biscuits. I understand that example and I'd conveniently interprete it as: Sobrevive a base de panecillos. So that, could I interprete the original sentence as:

    Los Lakers inauguran su marcador convirtiendo un robo de balón en dos puntos a base de una bandeja de LW
     

    juandiego

    Senior Member
    Spanish from Spain
    Again thank you mikey21 for your interest, and even more for the corrections.

    I think I'm starting to grasp the meaning of that "off". See my previous post.
     

    aztlaniano

    Senior Member
    English (Aztlán, US sector)
    "The Lakers get on the board by turning a takeaway into two points off of Luke Walton's driving layup". Is this case in question of the same construction? I mean, is "off" directly complementing the verb "turning" despite the phrase between them? [I think the answer is no way; turn off?!!!].

    From the same thread you've provided us, I'll pick an example: Survive off of biscuits. I understand that example and I'd conveniently interprete it as: Sobrevive a base de panecillos. So that, could I interprete the original sentence as:

    Los Lakers inauguran su marcador convirtiendo un robo de balón en dos puntos a base de una bandeja de LW
    Sí, a base de funciona bien aquí.
    Y "off" no tiene nada que ver con "turning". La frase podría terminar con "two points": The Lakers get on the board by turning a takeaway into two points. Lo que viene después es para precisar cómo, de qué manera, obtuvieron los dos puntos. They got the two points off of LW's driving layup. Se podría decir "off LW's ...", como señala fenixpollo, o usar "from" o "as a result of" (LW's ...).
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    One last question. Do those "off" and "of" sound -are pronounced- the same in general and specifically in that situation when they are back to back?
    "Off" and "of" are never pronounced the same in my dialect.

    "Off" has a long "ah" vowel like the Spanish "a" and the "f" is not vocalized;
    "Of" has a short "uh" schwa vowel, and the "f" is vocalized like the English "v".

    When they appear back to back, they are pronounced as one word (where the "3" represents the schwa): AH - f3v
     
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