Get out of Dodge

Anakin59

Senior Member
Argentina - castellano
According to MerriamWebster, get out of Dodge is "to leave or get out in a hurry."
I wonder if one could say "get out of dodge from something" like
getting out of dodge from your fears
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Dodge, here, is probably a reference to Dodge City.
    So to "... get out of Dodge," could be an idiomatic phrase, meaning to leave town in a hurry - an allusion to ancient, black and white, cowboy films.
    If that is correct, then your suggested example would not be correct.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    According to MerriamWebster, get out of Dodge is "to leave or get out in a hurry."
    I wonder if one could say "get out of dodge from something" like
    getting out of dodge from your fears
    As Panj says, this is an allusion to the old western movies whereby the good Sheriff of Dodge City (it could be any old west town but it's often "Dodge City") chases the bad guys out of Dodge. Because this is where this saying comes from "Dodge" is always capitalized and does not mean "to dodge" something. The phrase would be used in this way:

    1st Person: "Man, I think that store security guard is looking at us funny. Do you think he knows that we're shoplifting?"
    2nd Person: "I don't know but if we're going to get away with it, we'd better get out of Dodge right now"

    The answer to your question, therefore, is that you cannot use this phrase for something like getting away from your fears.
     

    Joelline

    Senior Member
    American English
    Hi,

    I've heard "Get out of Dodge" since I was a child--primarily used in cowboy movies in the US. It is frequently used as a command in sentences such as, "Get out of Dodge by noon or face the consequences."

    I suppose it could be used figuratively to mean "to leave or get out in a hurry," but this is not common.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,

    I've heard "Get out of Dodge" since I was a child--primarily used in cowboy movies in the US. It is frequently used as a command in sentences such as, "Get out of Dodge by noon or face the consequences."

    I suppose it could be used figuratively to mean "to leave or get out in a hurry," but this is not common.
    Actually, it's quite common in my neck of the woods, Joelline. You hear it from kids on the playgrounds, in school, etc. Anytime one of them jumps on a bike with a gang of friends to go zooming around the neighbourhood, the rallying cry is "Let's get out of Dodge".
     

    domangelo

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Dodge is a pretty dangerous place, lots of gunplay at the local saloon, and duels at high noon, that sort of thing. Get out of Dodge is to get out of harm's way.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    The expression has been and is still used simply to mean, Let's leave.

    Let's get out of Dodge.
    Let's blow this pop stand.
    Let's go.
    We're outta here! (We are out of here!)

    All of these mean the same thing. In addition, the expression can mean to leave to avoid trouble.

    I hear it said by young people in this fairly rural community.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Note that Dodge City, Kansas is very real and has a very real history apart from the glamorization in films and apparently was about as wild as one could get. Click HERE.

    Nowadays, of course, it's also a tourist attraction, like Tombstone, Arizona.
     

    CRISPY69

    Member
    USA, English
    Isn't it from Gunsmoke? To me, Dodge is New York in general, where I'm from, and anywhere north of 116th Street in Manhattan in specific. I'm in the process of getting out of Dodge, in the general sense, as we speak.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It is considerably older than Gunsmoke.

    The scene that it brings to mind is the bad guy, (dressed in black) is facing off with the good guy (usually the sheriff). There is usually a deadline involved.

    Sometimes there were two bad guys involved and then there would be the added line, "This town ain't big enough for the two of us."

    And usually there would be the underlying threat of a gun fight and death.

    Personally, I never say, "I'm getting out of Dodge." I usually say, "I'm bustin' out of this joint." And sometimes I add the uber-macho, "This place can't hold a man like me."

    Addendum: I did a Google search and "Answer Maven" had Mitch state that the phrase figured prominently in Gunsmoke. He does not cite any sources for this statement. They may be the main promulgator of this, but certainly not the originator.
     

    OMT

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Note, that in modern use, you usually see it constructed as "get the hell out of Dodge."
     

    CRISPY69

    Member
    USA, English
    Sure, getting out of Dodge is retro, no doubt. When I bust out, I think I might neutralize the "of" to a schwa (atta) and a lot of people drop the "of" altogether for a more organic feel, but that could be regional (East New York vs. Eastern Long Island). Keep having fun. Gotta roll.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    To be honest, I usually "Get the fuck out of Dodge," but that's a question of register and depends on audience, you know?
    It would be a different version of Gunsmoke than I was watching as a kid. (And Miss Kitty wasn't really a prostitute--just a friendly lady saloon owner.)
     
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