<get out of > here vs. <get off> my lawn

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taraa

Senior Member
Persian
Can you please explain the difference between "get off" and "get out of"? Why is it "get off" in the first one but "get out of" in the second one?

Nebbercracker: Oh, get off my lawn!
[Eliza screams and tries to peddle away, but her tricycle is still stuck as Nebbercracker storms up to her]
Trespasser! Do you want to be eaten alive?
Eliza: No.
Nebbercracker: [points down the street as he screams] Then, get out of here!
Monster House, film
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    In the first instance, Eliza is ON his lawn on her bicycle so N tells her to get OFF his lawn.

    In the second instance he is telling her to 'go away from here/get out of this place' (he points down the road, where he wants her to go) – a more general instruction to cycle away.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    In the first instance, Eliza is ON his lawn on her bicycle so N tells her to get OFF his lawn.

    In the second instance he is telling her to 'go away from here/get out of this place' (he points down the road, where he wants her to go) – a more general instruction to cycle away.
    Thank you Chez!
    So can't we use "get off" for the second one and "get out of" for the first, please?
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Get off my lawn, porch, sidewalk, patio, roof, or other open surface.

    Get out of my house, car, office, pool, room, or other contained space.

    Get out of here, get out of my life.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Get off my lawn, porch, sidewalk, patio, roof, or other open surface.

    Get out of my house, car, office, pool, room, or other contained space.

    Get out of here, get out of my life.
    We don't 'get out of' a lawn, though we could use it with 'garden/yard'.
    We don't 'get off' here.
    Thank you both!
    Sorry, "garden/yard" aren't open surfaces like "lawn" that's why we can use "get out off" for them, right?
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Thank you both!
    Sorry, "garden/yard" aren't open surfaces like "lawn" that's why we can use "get out off" for them, right?
    Probably because they are enclosed? More domestic? This really boils down to usage and not grammar. There is no real rule here as to why you are on a lawn but in a garden.

    The same preposition distinction would apply in all sentences. I am in my garden. I am walking on the sidewalk.

    So if you are in a room or garden or office, then "get out" makes sense.

    But if you are on a lawn, sidewalk, or road, then "get off" makes sense.

    Of course you are in a car or train.

    You are on a bike, motorbike, or boat.

    You can be either in or on an airplane.

    Etc. It's just the regular tricky English prepositions of place, and there's lots of places to study these.
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    In the US, "Get off my lawn" has become a rather joking but fixed expression. It is used when appropriate and fits the situation. "Clint Eastwood" made it such when he used to shout it at his neighbors kids, who were of the "Lao Hmong" variety. This is from the script for the movie "Gran Torino"; the set was in Detroit, MI. The Gran Torino was made by the Ford Motor Company and became a classic car.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Probably because they are enclosed? More domestic? This really boils down to usage and not grammar. There is no real rule here as to why you are on a lawn but in a garden.

    The same preposition distinction would apply in all sentences. I am in my garden. I am walking on the sidewalk.

    So if you are in a room or garden or office, then "get out" makes sense.

    But if you are on a lawn, sidewalk, or road, then "get off" makes sense.

    Of course you are in a car or train.

    You are on a bike, motorbike, or boat.

    You can be either in or on an airplane.

    Etc. It's just the regular tricky English prepositions of place, and there's lots of places to study these.
    Thank you again for the good explanation. :)
    In the US, "Get off my lawn" has become a rather joking but fixed expression. It is used when appropriate and fits the situation. "Clint Eastwood" made it such when he used to shout it at his neighbors kids, who were of the "Lao Hmong" variety. This is from the script for the movie "Gran Torino"; the set was in Detroit, MI. The Gran Torino was made by the Ford Motor Company and became a classic car.
    Thank you. :)
    Can I ask why it is rather joking, please?
     

    The pianist

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you again for the good explanation. :)

    Thank you. :)
    Can I ask why it is rather joking, please?
    Because if someone is sitting in my favorite chair I can say (with a smile on my face) "Get Off My Lawn" and that person will know what I mean because almost everyone is familiar with it.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Because if someone is sitting in my favorite chair I can say (with a smile on my face) "Get Off My Lawn" and that person will know what I mean because almost everyone is familiar with it.
    Aha, the joke is this that you use "my lawn" instead of "my chair".
    I understand. Thank you again. :):)
     
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