get over the way

  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Get over" = cope with; deal with; successfully deal with, etc.

    I can't cope with the way you love me like you do.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The idiom is "to get over something". It means something like "I can't suppress the emotion that (this "something") causes me to feel".
    So "I can't get over the way you love me" means "the way you love me amazes me, and this feeling of amazement won't go away".

    It sounds sickeningly romantic.:p
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    WRF Collins:

    get over vb
    1. to cross or surmount (something)
    2. (intr, preposition) to recover from (an illness, shock, etc)
    3. (intr, preposition) to overcome or master (a problem)
    4. (intr, preposition) to appreciate fully: I just can't get over seeing you again
    5. (tr, adverb) to communicate effectively
    6. (tr, adverb) sometimes followed by with: to bring (something necessary but unpleasant) to an end: let's get this job over with quickly

    The fourth one, I think.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The idiom is "to get over something". It means something like "I can't suppress the emotion that (this "something") causes me to feel".
    So "I can't get over the way you love me" means "the way you love me amazes me, and this feeling of amazement won't go away".

    It sounds sickeningly romantic.:p
    It is a Queen song and a bit sappy, with no effective imagery. Boring.

    Queen – I Want to Break Free

    I've fallen in love
    I've fallen in love for the first time

    And this time I know it's for real
    I've fallen in love, yeah
    God knows, God knows I've fallen in love
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The idiom is "to get over something". It means something like "I can't suppress the emotion that (this "something") causes me to feel".
    So "I can't get over the way you love me" means "the way you love me amazes me, and this feeling of amazement won't go away".
    This explanation is clear, but how does"like you do" fit it?
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I
    This explanation is clear, but how does"like you do" fit it?
    I can't stop being amazed at (I can't get over) the way you love me (the way you love me) in the manner in which you love me (like you do).
    Not really sense-making, is it? But 'do' does rhyme with 'true' so it has that going for it.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I

    I can't stop being amazed at (I can't get over) the way you love me (the way you love me) in the manner in which you love me (like you do).
    Not really sense-making, is it? But 'do' does rhyme with 'true' so it has that going for it.
    "the way you love me"="in the manner in which you love me"?
    "the way you love me"="like you do"?
    If so, then the same thing is said twice by different clauses and these clauses should be separated with a comma?
    I can't get over the way you love me, like you do.. =
    I can't get over the way you love me and can't get over like you love me?
    I'm not sure that it is clear to me.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I don't understand your question, but I think you;re right that "the same thing is said twice by different clauses." I wouldn't use a comma after 'me'. But that's partly because the whole sentence doesn't make sense to me grammatically.
     

    yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    But that's partly because the whole sentence doesn't make sense to me grammatically.
    I can't get it too((
    RM1(SS) says that the meaning is 4) which is not we talk about. Then how it would sound if it had the 4) meaning?
    Also, "like you do", as I think, could refers to the whole statement "I can't get over the.." as opposite to it.
    I can't get over it like you do.(you can get over it, but I can't)
    I'm still confused.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I can't get it too((
    RM1(SS) says that the meaning is 4) which is not we talk about. Then how it would sound if it had the 4) meaning?
    Also, "like you do", as I think, could refers to the whole statement "I can't get over the.." as opposite to it.
    I can't get over it like you do.(you can get over it, but I can't)
    I'm still confused.
    I've never heard or used 'can't get over' to mean 'can't appreciate fully' as in 4): 'I just can't appreciate fully seeing you again.' I don't think the speaker means that he is failing to appreciate fully the person he's in love with.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Premise:
    She loves him and he knows she loves him and he is a little surprised that she does.
    (Substitute any pronouns you want.)

    It's strange but it's true = it's hard to believe that you love me but I know it's true

    I can't get over = I am continually amazed at

    the way you love me = the strength of your feelings for me that you show

    like you do. = [do indicates an ongoing condition] like you always do, like you always display
     
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