get pool floats ripped/torn/etc

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Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello, everyone

My question today is about pool floats. Do they are ripped, torn, or what?
and, when talking about them, can I use the verb get? like :

"I don't let my cousins borrow my pool floats anymore. They always get them ripped/torn (or another verb)"

Thank you!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    What are these floats made of? Only paper, fabrics, plastic sheets etc. can be ripped or torn. Solid objects need a verb such as break, snap, fracture. Hollow objects under pressure burst.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    By "pool floats," do you mean something like this flimsy plastic toy?

    (Pool floats can mean just about anything - you need to be more specific)

     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    What are these floats made of? Only paper, fabrics, plastic sheets etc. can be ripped or torn. Solid objects need a verb such as break, snap, fracture. Hollow objects under pressure burst.
    I didn't find any image of a float as I want it, so let's change the object. A football ball. If it is like this: http://colunadoflamengo.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/bolamurcha1.jpg

    It's deflated. Let's suppose someone kick the ball into the bushes, a place filled with thorns , and now the ball is deflated. How can I say that with a verb? like: "The kids get the ball pierced/broken/ (which verb?)" ??
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The verb "get" is overused. You do not need it here. They always puncture my float when they borrow it. They kicked the ball into the bushes and it burst/was punctured. ("got punctured" is used frequently)

    No, "pierced" is not a synonym for "punctured" in this context. If you need to inflate something to use it, it can be punctured - deflating slowly or quickly - or it can burst - deflating very quickly. Tyres, swimming floats, footballs ...
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    The verb "get" is overused. You do not need it here. They always puncture my float when they borrow it. They kicked the ball into the bushes and it burst/was punctured. ("got punctured" is used frequently)

    No, "pierced" is not a synonym for "punctured" in this context. If you need to inflate something to use it, it can be punctured - deflating slowly or quickly - or it can burst - deflating very quickly. Tyres, swimming floats, footballs ...
    so why do you use the two of them here --> "The ball or float was pierced by thorns. It was "punctured"." what's the difference between them?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Piercing" is the mechanism of making holes. "Punctured" is what has happened to the inflated object.

    The ball hit the bush. The thorns pierced the ball = The thorns made holes in the ball. The ball has been punctured.
    He punctured the tyre by piercing it with a nail.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    "Piercing" is the mechanism of making holes. "Punctured" is what has happened to the inflated object.

    The ball hit the bush. The thorns pierced the ball = The thorns made holes in the ball. The ball has been punctured.
    He punctured the tyre by piercing it with a nail.
    So, with things like a "finger", should I use "pierce"? Like : I pierced my finger with a thorn"?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You're wandering away from the specific to the general use of words. Inflatable objects are a specific category. You can prick your finger on a thorn, and the thorn would pierce or puncture your skin. You wouldn't normally pierce your finger on a thorn. You might pierce your finger with a nail, or an electric drill, but then you'd have a hole all the way through your finger.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You're wandering away from the specific to the general use of words. Inflatable objects are a specific category. You can prick your finger on a thorn, and the thorn would pierce or puncture your skin. You wouldn't normally pierce your finger on a thorn. You might pierce your finger with a nail, or an electric drill, but then you'd have a hole all the way through your finger.
    But I am confused about "pierce" and "puncture". Could you provide further explanation?
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    You're wandering away from the specific to the general use of words. Inflatable objects are a specific category. You can prick your finger on a thorn, and the thorn would pierce or puncture your skin. You wouldn't normally pierce your finger on a thorn. You might pierce your finger with a nail, or an electric drill, but then you'd have a hole all the way through your finger.
    Can I use "I punctured my car's tyre" and "My car's tyre was punctured"? or "I punctured my car's tyre with a nail"
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Can I use "I punctured my car's tyre" and "My car's tyre was punctured"? or "I punctured my car's tyre with a nail"
    Yes, both of those are fine. We normally use the verb "puncture" to mean to make a hole in a tyre with something sharp - such as a nail. If you say "I punctured my car's tyre" you are saying that you did something to cause the puncture - "I drove over some nails in the road and I punctured my car's tyre." Although we would probably leave out "car's" because we know that we're in a vehicle.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Yes, both of those are fine. We normally use the verb "puncture" to mean to make a hole in a tyre with something sharp - such as a nail. If you say "I punctured my car's tyre" you are saying that you did something to cause the puncture - "I drove over some nails in the road and I punctured my car's tyre." Although we would probably leave out "car's" because we know that we're in a vehicle.
    just two things:

    1" "My car's tyre was punctured/got punctured?" is that better? ...2 and, which one is better: I punctured my car's tyre with a nail or I pierced my car's tyre with a nail?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think I already said that we talk about puncturing tyres. Your punctured tyre sentences are perfectly acceptable. We don't use "pierce" when we are talking about flat tyres.
     
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