get someone else up (imperative reflexive verb)

Word Eater

Senior Member
Russian - Moscow
Hola. I know that in imperativo reflexive verbs for nosotros and vosotros lose parts of their endings.
For example:
levantar - vosotros: levantad, nosotros: levantemos
levantarse - vosotros: levantaos, nosotros: levantemonos

But what's happening when we mean not to "to get yourself up", but "to get someone else up"? Like if I order vosotros to get ella up.
levantala or levantadla and levantemola or levantemosla?
 
  • levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's an interesting question.

    I would use "despertar" rather than "levantar" personally.

    Tú: Despierta + la = despiértala. You have to put an accent on the second word, because the stress stays in the same place, on the e.

    Vosotroes: Despertad + la = despertadla. Here there is no accent, because the original word is aguda (last syllable stressed) and this word is llana (penultimate syllable), which is regular, so in both cases "tad" is stressed.
     

    Word Eater

    Senior Member
    Russian - Moscow
    Thank you, levmac, for pointing out lack of accents in my post. Yes, now I think "despertar" fits better, but it was the first -se verb appeared in my head. It could be vestirse, afeitarse, peinarse etc.
     

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have to say, I hardly ever give orders in vosotros, so I really have to think hard. Vestir is maybe the most normal of your examples, I guess.

    viste + le = vístele [correction: viste + lo = vístelo]

    vestid + le = vestidle [correction: vestid + lo = vestidlo]
     
    Last edited:

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    Agró, my impression is that natives sometimes avoid these imperatives. Is that the case, or is it simply I haven't heard another people ordering "vosotros" around?

    For vosotros, I might use "ir [id] al dormitorio a despertar tu hermana" instead of "despertad a tu hermana" for example.

    And for nosotros, I might use "vamos a vestirla" instead of "vistámosla".

    Is that normal? Or am I dodging the hard grammar? :)
     

    Julvenzor

    Senior Member
    Español propio (Andalucía, España)
    I have to say, I hardly ever give orders in vosotros, so I really have to think hard. Vestir is maybe the most normal of your examples, I guess.

    viste + le = vístele

    vestid + le = vestidle

    Hi levmac,

    I only want to remember you these forms fall into the "leísmo" category (just in case that you didn't know).

    Bye! :thumbsup:
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    Agró, my impression is that natives sometimes avoid these imperatives. Is that the case, or is it simply I haven't heard another people ordering "vosotros" around?

    For vosotros, I might use "ir [id] al dormitorio a despertar tu hermana" instead of "despertad a tu hermana" for example.

    And for nosotros, I might use "vamos a vestirla" instead of "vistámosla".

    Is that normal? Or am I dodging the hard grammar? :)
    Yes, we do try to avoid those forms, and I don't know why really.
    "Vamos a + inf." is the most usual form.
     

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, we do try to avoid those forms, and I don't know why really.
    "Vamos a + inf." is the most usual form.
    The first time I asked a flatmate about imperatives with vosotros, she told me that it was old-fashioned Spanish that she associated with Don Quixote!!! She said something like "¡Venid todos y comed conmigo!" to give an example of how archaic it sounded to her.

    I was very bemused, because I was teaching English, and I thought, "How do teachers address a group of children if not with vosotros?" :)

    I have to say, the most important thing I learned was about the stress.

    Háblame.
    Habladme.

    Without that difference in stress, this can seem a very strange grammar point for an English speaker. Even so, I found myself tripping over my words last night when I had to say "confirmadme". There is something unusual about that prominent d sound at the end of a Spanish syllable.
     

    Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    Imperatives with "vosotros" are alive and kicking, of course, in most of Spain. Not so much in parts of Andalusia or the Canaries. Your flatmate might come from those areas.
    Also, almost everywhere in Spain, speakers tend to facilitate the pronunciation of that -d by turning it into a -z (/θ/): hablazme /a'blaθme/.
     
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