get started

< Previous | Next >

seeeker

Senior Member
I am not sure about the meaning of the phrase "get the office holiday party started" in the following sentence:

Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get the office holiday party started, but the app X is.

The lexical meaning of the phrase is "to begin doing or working on something." However, I wanted to confirm if it doesn't become "to become lively" in this context. The app has a rich collection of songs that can be chosen for karaoke singing.


Any suggestions or inputs?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Does this help?
    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get (= cause) the office holiday party (started) to start, but the app X is.

    He got the car to start by pushing it. = He got the car started (adjective) by pushing it


    To start = to commence

    He got the ice melted by heating it
     

    seeeker

    Senior Member
    Does this help?
    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get (= cause) the office holiday party (started) to start, but the app X is.

    He got the car to start by pushing it. = He got the car started (adjective) by pushing it


    To start = to commence

    He got the ice melted by heating it
    Thank you for your reply, PaulQ.

    I am still interested in knowing that if the world "start" implies that most Christmas parties start with carolling.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    However, I wanted to confirm if it doesn't become mean "to become lively" in this context.
    I believe it does mean this. The literal meaning of getting a party started is the time on the invitation. But the figurative meaning is the time the party becomes fun and exciting. You can imagine in an office party the first is guaranteed but the second is not.

    There's even a song with the same idea.
    "Get the party started"

    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get the office holiday party started, but the app X is. =

    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get people excited and in the mood at the office holiday party, but the app X is.
     

    seeeker

    Senior Member
    I believe it does mean this. The literal meaning of getting a party started is the time on the invitation. But the figurative meaning is the time the party becomes fun and exciting. You can imagine in an office party the first is guaranteed but the second is not.

    There's even a song with the same idea.
    "Get the party started"

    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get the office holiday party started, but the app X is. =

    Old-school carolling isn’t likely to get people excited and in the mood at the office holiday party, but the app X is.
    Thank you for your very helpful reply, kentix. Also, I appreciate the correction in the question.

    It is really interesting to know that how lexical meanings do not cover all connotations of words.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top