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mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Please explain to me whether "started" in "get started" is an adjective?
Thanks.
 
  • mimi2

    Senior Member
    vietnam vietnamese
    In the sentence: "let's get started" so I don't think it is a participle.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    We may have to wait for one of the authoritarian authoritative grammarians to confirm or deny, but I believe
    'to get started' is an idiom.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    nycphotography said:
    "to get started" is a phrasal verb

    the get gets conjugated, the started does not.
    I had written the same thing, then wussed out after failing to find it in about a dozen long lists of phrasal verbs. Curiously,
    it was used in the definitions of many other phrasal verbs.

    It has a verb and an uninflected adverbial particle, if you consider 'started' to be adverbial in the phrase, so I suppose it qualifies. I'm not comfortable with the adverbial characteristic of 'started'.

    What do you think?
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I am thinking aloud (well the keys make some noise).

    If "get started" is a phrasal verb, it is in this case a gerund, a verb working as a noun. Gerunds can take subjects and complements to form gerund phrases.

    (You) {implied subject}
    let/permit {predicate}
    us (to) get started {gerund phrase working as direct object)
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    You know.... I think it's not even a phrasal verb after all...


    Get = to achieve or obtain some thing or some state.

    started = past participle of to start = adj = state of being started.

    Get + any PP / ADJ has the same meaning.
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I am relieved to be relieved of phrasal verbs. I am becoming acquainted with them for the first time in this forum.

    (You) {implied subject}
    let {predicate}
    us {indirect object)
    get started {direct object, gerund phrase}

    A gerund may take its own subjects and/or complements to form a gerund phrase. In this case, the gerund takes a gerund as its complement.

    (You) {implied subject}
    let/permit {predicate}
    us (to) get started {gerund phrase working as direct object)6th January 2006 10:41 PM

    In this previous posting I had parsed the gerund phrase to include "us" as its subject. In the second I have taken "us" as an indirect object and relieved the gerund phrase of its subject.

    I really can't see a difference. I wonder if there is. Anyone?
    I guess a better question is, "Does anyone care"?
     

    Black_Mamba

    Member
    England,English
    Surely the 'get' is modifying the 'started'? You could say 'I will start' or 'I will get started' Therefore the 'started' would be a past participle and the 'get' an adverb. Mind you, in my sentences it's future tense. Perhaps 'get' is an auxilliary? Oh I don't know, it's complicated!
     

    James Stephens

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Complicated indeed, but it is not possible for "get" to work as an adverb. Verb forms not working as verbs can only work as nouns or adjectives: gerunds or participles. Adverbial useage need not apply.
     
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