get through vs break through

loureed4

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello,

I am studying the verb "break through" and it seems to me it can overlap with "get through", for instance, in this sentence:

"He went through/broke through a lot of hardships but eventually he fulfilled his mission."

Can it be so? that both work in this context meaning the same?

Thanks in advance!
 
  • GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    In your example, I don't think it works. "Broke through" can mean "get through" for a physical object (e.g. "break through the wall"), or it can mean in a metaphorical sense (e.g. "break through the language barrier").

    These are the uses that I can think of for "break through"... :)
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I see, thanks GMF1991.

    So, in a figurative sense, it hasn´t anything to do with "break through a difficult situation, like "get through" ?

    Again: Thanks!
     

    loureed4

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot GMF!

    But I have just read this in the definition of "break through": "...to successfully deal with something that is stopping you making progress."

    According to which, in my view, the following makes sense: "He broke through a lot of hardships but eventually he fulfilled his mission."

    Gracias por tu ayuda GMF, that is really nice of you!! :)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "He broke through a lot of hardships but eventually he fulfilled his mission" may make sense to you, lou, but I agree with GMF. There isn't enough space in dictionaries for a discussion of nuances of meaning.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top