get to know other beaches

CORALINNA

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brasil
A - How long will you stay here?
B - 2 weeks
A - Where will you go after that?
B - I’ll probably get to know other beaches.

Can you “get to know beaches”? What’s the best verb? Visit, go?
 
  • pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello CORALINNA,
    It would be more natural to say, "go to some other beaches." You could also say, "check out other beaches." It is much more colloquial.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    That's arguably true, pcy0308, if by "more natural" you mean "more likely to be heard." But Coralinna's version sounds perfectly natural to me. She's using "get to know some other beaches" in the same way that somebody might use "get acquainted with some other beaches." It really isn't unnatural to use a figurative expression like Coralinna's in a remark about her plan for some beaches.

    Does it sound as though Coralinna's remark may be influenced by Portuguese? Yes. Does that make it sound unnatural? No. I don't think so.
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hello,

    I would say:

    Go to some other beaches
    Visit some other beaches

    These verbs convey travel, whereas “get” by itself leaves out the idea of movement.

    -I’m planning to spend a whole month at Myrtle Beach.
    -Wow, then you’ll get to know that area really well!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    She's using "get to know some other beaches" in the same way that somebody might use "get acquainted with some other beaches."
    I can't imagine anyone saying either of those things in any context much less as the answer to the question "Where will you go after that?"
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Okay. I believe you. But that observation probably won't do a very good job of convincing anybody that Coralinna's sentence is unnatural.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Okay. I believe you. But that observation probably won't do a very good job of convincing anybody that Coralinna's sentence is unnatural.
    If you believe me, then you must believe that it is unnatural to me. Generally, I haven't previously experienced being in disagreement with other people on what is and isn't unnatural, so I assume that there are other people who find it unnatural. Even if the sentence were natural on it's own, it's a bit of a non-sequitur in the context which is "unnatural" as well.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    For what it's worth, the issue of "know" a place is a common translation error in English vs Portuguese/Spanish.:rolleyes:
    as a Spanish example, see: Conoce Tegucigalpa
    In this case the imperative "Know" means "come visit."
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If you believe me, then you must believe that it is unnatural to me.
    I do. I imagine that you posted your thoughts on the subject in an effort to let Coralinna know that you thought her remark was unnatural and that the context she suggested isn't convincing. I wouldn't have responded to your first post at all if you had not quoted my response in that post. I interpret such quotes to be a valid reason for replying to whoever posted the quote.

    My apologies, sdgraham. I can certainly understand your exasperation with what may look like a needless exchange to you. But I feel compelled to respond to posts that seem to be addressed to me because they contain a quote of some opinion I gave earlier.

    By the way, I consider your comment in post #9 to be a comment that was well worth making. I'm sure that somebody will be interested in knowing that this is considered an error if a translator chooses the wrong meaning or wrong context to convey the original meaning in the source language.
     
    Last edited:

    pcy0308

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hello all,
    I must second pachanga7, Myridon and sdgraham here. Given the provided conversation segment and the question "where will go you after that," it is much more natural to use "go" or "visit" rather than "get to know," (which is not grammatically incorrect). There is no mention of the expression "get to know a place or a city" being unnatural. However, using "go" or "visit" as a response to the specific question above seems like much more natural answer for me.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Given the provided conversation segment and the question "where will go you after that," it is much more natural to use "go" or "visit" rather than "get to know," (which is not grammatically incorrect). There is no mention of the expression "get to know a place or a city" being unnatural.
    Thanks for sharing your latest, possibly last, assessment of the topic, pcy0308. This assessment gives Coralinna more data that she can use in making her own final assessment about the value that her remark has in English. I am untroubled by the opinions of others when it comes to a subjective decision about the natural quality of a phrase that is influenced by another language. I didn't expect to find many opinions in this thread that agreed with mine.

    I hope that Coralinna returns to this thread to tell us what she thinks after reading all the comments.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    We don't have adequate background. If, in the original conversation, "here" is a beach, the answer "I’ll probably get to know some other beaches" would seem perfectly reasonable to me. The only thing wrong, for me, would be the omission of "some".

    I see that owlman5 added "some" in his comments - possibly without noticing that he did so.

    By the way, I have no knowledge of Portuguese and Spanish other than how to say "hello", "please" and "thank you", and to order a couple of beers or a glass of wine.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Thanks for the reply, Coralinna. I'm glad that you had a chance to get back to this thread and take a look at people's opinions about the topic.
     
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